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  1. #1

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    Processing old BW exposed film

    Hello,

    Suggestions, please, on how to process some exposed BW film from the
    early 1960s. My dad shot some off-brand "Rex" ASA 80 120 panchromatic film made in Belgium with dates from 1961-63. There is also some Verichrome 127 and Anscopan 126 from the same era.

    I'm hoping some of it contains family photos; more than likely it will have heavy fog and thin images.

    Snip a portion, tank not rotary, prewet, stand development or 2 inversions every 30 secs, D-76 straight, 15 to 20 minutes, as starting point?
    Thanks for your help!

    Brian

  2. #2

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    I usually snip a just a sliver on the end and develop it just to see how fog I need to deal with and if I need add a restainer. For my test neg I mark out with ruler and use tape or if know someone is blind or visually impaired a product called high dots for a tatical mark for each frame 6X6 or 6X9 for the 120 and try to cut just one frame. At that point your starting times is as good any for medium speed film from the 60s as any other.

  3. #3
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    i'm not so sure about the fog; the 1960s aren't too old for slow or medium speed films. Though the only way to find out is to try it ... processing old films is ALWAYS fun, because you never know what you'll find / how it'll come out.

    Please post results when [if] you get any ...

  4. #4
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
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    I just did some verichrome pan from the early 60's and found that HC110, dilution B for 7 min was about right. There was a wonderful site mentioned in another thread about a whole parcel of found film that was on line, images of the mid 1940's to early 50's. I don't have the link handy but the soup in every case was the same - HC110 7 min. Seemed to work well.

  5. #5
    Wade D's Avatar
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    When dealing with old film or paper I usually add some potassium bromide to the developer. 5 to 10 crystals disolved in 10ml water then added to the developer will lower the fog to an acceptable level in most cases.

  6. #6

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    5 to 10 crystals? You mean flakes or ...?

  7. #7
    juan's Avatar
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    I've also had good results developing old film in Rodinal. I think I used 1:50. Also, if you mix your own, you might try what's been called Divided D-23 here. Soak the film in an A solution of metol, then in a B solution of borax or sodium carbonate. Search the site for D-23.
    juan

  8. #8
    Wade D's Avatar
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    The bottle I have is Kodak potassium bromide. It is in the form of small crystals or perhaps granular would be a better term. I,m not much of a chemist so my terminology is probably wrong.

  9. #9

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    Wade,

    OK, that helps some; are the crystals larger or smaller than table salt? How about Kosher Salt?

    I am about to develop a roll of Verichrome Pan shot in 1972 and would like to use this fog restrainer on this roll.

    Frank W.

  10. #10
    Wade D's Avatar
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    The granules are larger than table salt. Usually about 1 to 1.5 millimeters.
    I don't know if there is an exact formula for how much to use.
    This ammount was suggested by my photography instructor in college 30 years ago. I have used it with good results for expired film and paper since then.

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