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  1. #11
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    LP-FIX NEUTRAL

    We are using LP-FIX NEUTRAL --a pH neutral fixer-- for bartya/FB paper. However, it does not offer any advantage to use this product with film or RC paper. The chief advantage is that the print thus fixed will be archival, with no risk of acid eating away at the base. Similarly, this product will avoid any undesirable staining with alternative/historical processes, while offering a higher throughput rate than an alkali fixer.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by foto-r3
    We are using LP-FIX NEUTRAL --a pH neutral fixer-- for bartya/FB paper. However, it does not offer any advantage to use this product with film or RC paper. The chief advantage is that the print thus fixed will be archival, with no risk of acid eating away at the base. Similarly, this product will avoid any undesirable staining with alternative/historical processes, while offering a higher throughput rate than an alkali fixer.
    I have not used or tested LP-FIX NEUTRAL and thus have no opinion of it.

    However, I have used and tested

    Ryuji’s Neutral rapid fixer. It is now my standard fixer for both film and paper.


    http://www.apug.org/forums/article.php?a=99


    Some quotes from Ryuji

    “This fixer gives rapid fixing and rapid washing, same benefit as what's claimed for alkaline fixers, but with minimum of swelling.

    “This fixer is for both film and paper. Use undiluted.”

    “I should also add that the fixer's capacity depends on agitation and temperature. Also, watch out for the dilution of the bath due to stop bath carryover. Two stage fixation is one effective way to ensure good results, although it is unnecessary with ammonium thiosulfate fixer when it is not pushed to exhaustion.”
    Tom Hoskinson
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  3. #13
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    LP-FIX NEUTRAL is a product made by LABOR PARTNER, a German concern that has been producing fine photochemicals since 1984. Distributed by MACO. It is also a rapid fixer. With a dilution of 1+4, 2 minutes are suggested and at 1+7, 4 minutes.

    I would suggest that a alkali fixer reaches exhaustion before a pH-neutral fixer, and a pH-neutral fixer before an acid-based fixer (treating the same number and type of copies). But there are an array of factors that intervene in this. To wit: a fixer will reach exhaustion faster if the prints have large white areas (undeveloped silver dissolved in the bath). And, yes, so-called "cascade fixing" is a reliable practice.

    I do not think the concept of "rapid washing" for pH-neutral/alkali fixers has been scientically proven since these contain the same kinds and amounts of fixing salts which are what must be washed out.

  4. #14

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    Thanks guys but I was really just looking for some feedback about Alkali-FIX

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by antielectrons
    Thanks guys but I was really just looking for some feedback about Alkali-FIX
    Sorry, but I haven't used Alkali-FIX so I have no experience based data.

    I did look on the Alkali-FIX web site - and was turned off by their Hard Sell Hype.

    Here is an unfortunate example:

    “We all know what happens to a metal when it is in contact with an acid; the acid reacts with and eats away the metal. Immersing the delicate silver grains of your fine print in acid is not the best thing you can do! The delicate high values are at risk, and you are in danger of burned-out highlights, particularly if your mixing/timing routine is lax. The answer is an alkaline stop (or water bath) and an alkaline fix…”

    Chemistry was evidently not this ad writer's strongest academic subject.

    From: http://www.monochromephotography.com/fixer.htm
    Tom Hoskinson
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  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by foto-r3
    ................

    I would suggest that a alkali fixer reaches exhaustion before a pH-neutral fixer, and a pH-neutral fixer before an acid-based fixer (treating the same number and type of copies). But there are an array of factors that intervene in this. To wit: a fixer will reach exhaustion faster if the prints have large white areas (undeveloped silver dissolved in the bath). And, yes, so-called "cascade fixing" is a reliable practice.

    I do not think the concept of "rapid washing" for pH-neutral/alkali fixers has been scientically proven since these contain the same kinds and amounts of fixing salts which are what must be washed out.
    As far as washing is concerned, I have read that alkaline fixer washes out of emulsion faster than does acid fixer. I have not found anything that definitively says that alkaline fixer washes faster from fibre paper, and that is the only washing that concerns me. Film washes fast, and RC paper does too.

    As far as capacity is concerned, it's the amount of silver compounds in fixer that limits its useful capacity, even if it has enough thiosulphate in reserve to remove much more silver halide. Acid and alkaline fixers would be identical in this regard, I would think.

    I use neutral or slightly alkaline fixer for paper to avoid the SO2 odour. It makes a big differnce in the darkroom. I use it for film to preserve the stain that I get from Pyrocat-HD (and previously PMK).

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson
    I did look on the Alkali-FIX web site ... Here is an ... example:
    “...the delicate silver grains of your ... The delicate high values
    are at risk The answer is an alkaline stop ...
    The above much expurgated quote does no justice to
    Mr. Hoskinson and little to the promoter of the product.

    The promoter's pitch did remind me of a recent post
    where in was mentioned a micro film's total loss of image
    after fixing in a strong fixer. I wonder, just how many
    are experiencing loss of fine detail?

    An alkaline stop if it be sulfite has an advantage over
    a water stop in that it will help prevent oxidation of carry
    over developer. Also the emulsion will more quickly fix due
    to it's alkaline state. Two arguments for. The gentil, very
    dilute, one-shot, neutral fix I use incurs no build up of
    developer. So, no stop is needed. Dan

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