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  1. #1

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    Anyone using Alkali-Fix?

    Following my failed attempt to get some TF-4 I have decided to try out Alkali-Fix from http://www.monochromephotography.com/fixer.htm as it is available in Europe and seems to do just the same trick. Anyone used it? Any special recomendations?

    I am shooting FP4+, HP5+ and Tri-x, and use a water stop bath.

    Antonio

  2. #2

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    I've never used the specific product you mention, but I have been using home-made TF-3. It seems to work well (and very quickly), but I won't really know for some years, since it can take years for fixer problems to show up.

    The instructions on the Web site you reference say it's possible to use an acid stop bath with the Alkali-Fix product. That's not recommended with TF-3; for that, the usual recommendation is to use a water stop bath. I don't know if Alkali-Fix is sufficiently different to justify a different recommendation or if its manufacturer just doesn't consider the change in pH from carried-over acid stop to be significant enough to be a concern. Not being a photochemist myself, I can only go by others' recommendations on this point.

  3. #3
    Jon Butler's Avatar
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    Antonio,
    I have used Alkaline fix for film and prints and would like to use it all the time as it doesn't wipe out the colours when lith printing and is gentler on your negs highlights.
    Even if I make it myself from raw chems it far to expensive for me to use it full time at volumes I use. Acid fix costs me about £11 for 20L of working
    solution @ 4-1. You work out what your paying.

  4. #4

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    Why not look for C-41 fixer?

  5. #5

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    http://www.silverprint.co.uk/chem19.html

    Flexicolor Fixer & Rep 3.8 litres


    2.90 pounds including VAT

    If they carry the bigger stuff it'll be even cheaper.

    Do a search on C-41 fixer and B&W

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by antielectrons
    Following my failed attempt to get some TF-4 I have decided to try out Alkali-Fix from http://www.monochromephotography.com/fixer.htm as it is available in Europe and seems to do just the same trick. Anyone used it? Any special recomendations?

    I am shooting FP4+, HP5+ and Tri-x, and use a water stop bath.

    Antonio
    An alkaline (or pH neutral) rapid fixer is best for fixing film. The least expensive way to get one is to mix your own. I use Ryuji’s Neutral rapid fixer. The basis of Ryuji's Neutral Rapid Fixer is a 60% solution of Ammonium Thiosulfate (it costs me a little less than $16.00 per gallon). Thus my per liter cost for Ryuji's fixer is about 80 cents (200ml 60%Ammonium Thiosulfate per liter of working fixer).

    See:Ryuji’s Neutral rapid fixer

    http://www.apug.org/forums/article.php?a=99

    Another good Mix-Your-Own rapid fixer (only dry chems and water) is:

    Ole's Quick fix (OF-1)

    http://www.apug.org/forums/article.php?a=38
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  7. #7
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    Started with TF-4 because its recommended for Pyrocat, so I went ahead and used it for paper with no problems so far. Only alot of time will tell for sure. Of all the chems in my darkromm it is the most obnoxious as far as smell, (smells kind of like dilute ammonia) but I keep it covered in the tray, and have decent ventilation. If I didn't have a good ventilator it would be nasty.

  8. #8

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    TF-4 is an Ammonium Thiosulfate Rapid Fixer. In my experience, it works equally well with film and paper. It is capable of producing archival results with both film and paper (if you follow the recommended processes and procedures).

    TF-4 does release some ammonia during mixing and use.

    Ryuji's Neutral Rapid Fix also does a good (and archival) rapid fixing job on both film and paper. I use it with Pyrocat-HD and Pyrocat P, it does not reduce the Pyrocat image stain.

    It does not release ammonia during mixing and use.

    I have also found that Ryuji's Neutral Rapid Fix is more effective than TF-4 for removing anti-halation dye (i.e., TMAX Red) during film fixing.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    http://www.silverprint.co.uk/chem19.html

    Flexicolor Fixer & Rep 3.8 litres


    2.90 pounds including VAT

    If they carry the bigger stuff it'll be even cheaper.

    Do a search on C-41 fixer and B&W
    Thanks for the tip. Unfortunately Silverprint have a $260 minimum order for overseas shipments...

  10. #10

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    The C-41 fixers are usually very easy to obtain. They will not be in the black and white part of the shop, and the staff are unlikely to understand why you would use it instead of "black and white" fixer. I used to use Agfa FX-Universal (pH=7.5) but with their demise I will soon start using Kodak Flexicolor fixer (pH some where around 6.2, which of course is not alkaline but not very far from neutral). It is cheap. If I need it to be slightly alkaline, I will try adding some TEA.

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