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Thread: Flat

  1. #1

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    Flat

    I shot and developed a roll of HP5 today (35mm). My photos have all come out very "flat" looking.

    I've never taken shots on an overcast day. Today was very overcast.
    In overcast situations, is this flatness just plain unavoidable?
    Are there any ways or tricks to improve this (ie: Shooting techniques, developing)?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img1742.jpg  

  2. #2
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Looks a bit overexposed, and the contrast is off a bit, at least on my monitor, I might have played a bit with a filtration to see what would have given you best effect, I agree it does look a bit flat.

    Dave

  3. #3

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    Flat usually means underdeveloped.

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    Paul Sorensen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth
    Flat usually means underdeveloped.
    And, I will add, that if you are used to shooting in high contrast situations, you may have settled on a developing time that is a little short to compensate. Now that you have shot in overcast conditions, your worked out times might not serve you quite so well.

  5. #5
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    You can also look into filters: I find a yellow filter gives my photos a little extra "zing" in most conditions, especially when the light is flat.
    Of course, I would only do that after you follow the above advice (these guys know their stuff!) - there is no coloured piece of glass that can replace good fundamentals and understanding of controlling your exposure and exposure/development relationship.
    Are you developing/printing these yourself, or are they from a lab, by the way?

    Peter.

  6. #6
    metod's Avatar
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    I would also add that HP5+ in general looks flat. I was always disappointed in its muddy looks. The film is very suitable for pushing though, which increases the contrast and gives the film more life. Try push it (less exposure, more development) and see if you like the results.

    Metod

  7. #7
    lee
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    if HP5 looks flat MAYBE you need to develop it a little longer. I shot HP5 for years rated it at 200 and used PMK dev not a peoblem.

    lee\c

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    I was using one of my grandfather's old Minolta's. The light meter in it has proved tricky for me to use, so any under/over exposure is likely.

    I do the developing myself. I used D76 at 18C for 9 minutes. I'm not sure, I know the "ideal" temperture is around 20C/68F but I have no ways of heating my chemicals, do chemical temperatures have any affect on how the negatives will turn out looking?

    I have to admit that I do love high contrast and am used to high contrast situations.

    I was considering pushing the HP5 for more contrast. I'll try that next.

    I will also look into some colored filters. I currently have a UV and a polarizer. Could the polarizer help at all in this situation? I've read that they can enhance things sometimes, but have not done any experimenting.

    Considering the film, I use HP5+ for a few reasons: I generally love the look it gives in most situations, this one being an exception - I'm wondering if it's the film or just me, or a combination of both. I'm new to the chemical side of photography, and HP5 has been easiest and managable for me to do, HP5 is relatively cheap and easy for me to get at my local camera store.

    Any other films I could consider?

  9. #9
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    Is that a neg scan or a print scan?
    If it is a neg scan I think you oughta try printing.
    And you may use curves to adjust your scans. (just like in the example below)

    If it is a print scan, use a higher number filter.

    IMHO it is a full scale negative you have in there, properly exposed for the shadows and probably a tad overdeveloped for the highlight.
    Anyway in a wet darkroom you should be able to print it easily.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails APUGimg1742.jpg  
    Last edited by titrisol; 04-12-2006 at 09:45 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Mama took my APX away.....

  10. #10
    titrisol's Avatar
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    My answers in italics

    I was using one of my grandfather's old Minolta's. The light meter in it has proved tricky for me to use, so any under/over exposure is likely.
    I think your image os properly exposed

    I do the developing myself. I used D76 at 18C for 9 minutes. I'm not sure, I know the "ideal" temperture is around 20C/68F but I have no ways of heating my chemicals, do chemical temperatures have any affect on how the negatives will turn out looking?
    Development is temp sensitive, warmer developer will act faster and colder slower.
    Check in the Ilford website for a time-temp adjustment chart.
    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/applicati...load.asp?n=430


    I have to admit that I do love high contrast and am used to high contrast situations.

    I was considering pushing the HP5 for more contrast. I'll try that next.
    You may try that yes, but I think your next idea is better

    I will also look into some colored filters. I currently have a UV and a polarizer. Could the polarizer help at all in this situation? I've read that they can enhance things sometimes, but have not done any experimenting.
    Polarizer would have probably not helped you in an overcast day.
    Use it to darken sky or to make reflections in glass or water less noticeable, it is a very useful filter, but it is too easy to over-use it
    A yellow or orange filter would be far more useful for BW photography


    Considering the film, I use HP5+ for a few reasons: I generally love the look it gives in most situations, this one being an exception - I'm wondering if it's the film or just me, or a combination of both. I'm new to the chemical side of photography, and HP5 has been easiest and managable for me to do, HP5 is relatively cheap and easy for me to get at my local camera store.

    Your image looks very good for HP5+ in an overcast day, you may just have to learn some post processing

    Any other films I could consider?
    As of now, keep shooting HP5, and learn the quirks of it. Stick to D76/Id11 (they are the same)
    After you are satisfied that you can squeeze some good pics from HP5 move on, I'd reccomend FP4 which is slower or Fuji Neopan 400
    Last edited by titrisol; 04-12-2006 at 09:51 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Mama took my APX away.....

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