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  1. #1
    david b's Avatar
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    Ilford's Fiber Paper Washing Times

    I just downloaded "Processing B&W Paper" pdf from the Ilford site and noticed a possible discrepancy. On page 3, top left, it says to wash for 20 minutes.

    But then further down the page under the "optimim pernance sequence", it says to wash for 5 minutes.

    Both times are mentioned after using their washaid.

    Five minutes sounds awfully short. So is 20 minutes the correct time?

  2. #2

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    Not sure of Ilfords washing aid, but with PermaWash, you only wash for 5 minutes each time...before and after the wash aid.

    That does it to archival standards.

  3. #3
    david b's Avatar
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    thanks for the fast reply.

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    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    Looks like 5 mins is the correct time after having used washaid. 20-30 mins is more in the range of a normal washing cycle in water, with no chemical aid. Probably just a typo.
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

  5. #5
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    I read it as saying that the 5 minute time applies only if you follow the Ilford one minute fixer time processing sequence in the table. The 20 minutes is a general time needed if the print is in the fixer for longer, which most people use, hence the general recommendation of 20 mins.

    Cheers, Bob.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by david b
    I just downloaded "Processing B&W Paper" pdf
    That pdf is old info. You may wish to read the Hypam
    and/or Rapid pdfs; more recent. Years ago there was an
    Ilford Archival Processing Sequence. Now, how ever, which
    ever way you fix the 5-10-5 wash, hca, wash sequence
    is suggested. Ilford as much as recommends the two
    bath fix. That also with the 5-10-5 sequence. Dan

  7. #7
    reellis67's Avatar
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    It seems like that has come up before, although I can't find the thread. I think the general consensus was that 20 minutes without wash aid is correct.

    - Randy

  8. #8
    david b's Avatar
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    thanks everyone.

    I am now stocking my new darkroom with all Ilford products and want to make sure I have the procedue down correctly.

    So I think will be doing the two-bath fix then a 5 minute wash, then the 10 minute washaid, then another 5 minute wash.

    Sound right?

  9. #9

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    vigorus washing for more than 10 minutes is a waste of time and water.

  10. #10

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    Actually, unless the washaid you choose states 10 minutes, I wouldn't use that time. PermaWash, for example, is 5wash-5wash-aid-5final wash. And it doesn't matter if you use a 1 or 2 step fix with that washing sequence, although of course the 2 bath is better and cleaner.

    Someone above stated that you should also fix for the reccomended time Ilford suggests. I'm not sure about the version of rapid fixer they are producing now, but when it was called Universal Rapid Fixer , it was basically a film fixer that you over diluted and made into a paper fixer. So it was extra strength, for paper, to begin with, hence the 1 minute reccomendation for paper.

    Anyway, good luck.

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