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Thread: TF-4 fixer.

  1. #21

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    I use AA plain fixer, for film and paper
    water 800ml
    Sodium Thiosulfate 240 gr
    Sodium Sulfite 30 gr
    water to make 1 lt

    I use full strength, it's good for pyrocat or PMK, and ha no ammonia smell

  2. #22

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    Thanks Tom

    Mike

  3. #23
    Maine-iac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fhovie
    TF4 is a Formulary exclusive - not real cheap but very high capacity


    I have used both and was happy with both. I continue to use TF3 and would recommend it with no hesitation. I also recommend a scale. - I sell industrial scales. My choice is overkill so get one from E-Bay - get a test weight too if you like.

    Just my observation.
    I'm with Ole. My balance scale has sat unused for nearly 25 years, because I have not yet found a photo formula that needs such precision. I've used the conversion chart from grams to teaspoons in Henry Horenstein's book all these years and I can't imagine that the more tedious weighing of tiny bits of chemicals on my scales would make my photos any better. Better seeing might or better printing, but the fault, dear Brutus, is not in our teaspoons.

    Larry

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by fhovie
    TF4 is a Formulary exclusive - not real cheap but very high capacity
    TF3 is well published, very inexpensive, does 20 8x10 (or rolls) of film per liter or about 40 sheets of RC paper per liter - Less sheets of FB paper.
    I question the approbation that TF-4 fixer has a higher capacity than other ammonium thiosulfate fixers. From Kodak's literature for their Industrex Rapid Fixer, their fixer, diluted 1+3 has the capacity of 120 rolls of film. Diluted 1+7 is will fix 200 sheets of RC paper per gallon. This is greater than the stated capacity for TF-4.

  5. #25
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    I'm probably wrong here, as I'm nowhere close to acheiving my APUG Chemical Guru status card, but TF-3's stated capacity may have more to do with the realities of fixation while Kodak's may have more to do with advertising. As well, TF-3's esimate may be the capacity for a single bath, while Kodak's is for a double bath? Anyways, TF-3's estimate is per litre and Kodak's is per US gallon, and there's 3.8 litres in a gallon so the numbers are pretty close. Who uses fixer until it's close to not working anymore anyways? To much at stake!

    Murray
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    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  6. #26
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    I am certain that great results are had using teaspoons. Call it a crutch then. I measure out 0.2 grams of Phenidone for a particular formula where Phenidone is superadditive and a primary ingredient in a liter or more of fluid. I like to know that if something were to go wrong in my results, it is not my formulation. If I were mixing D76 or D23 or some other 1930 vintage soup, I am sure teaspoons would be all I need.

    As far as the capacity of TF4, my comment was from experience. I used it for over a year and when I switched to home made TF3, I noticed that I got at least 20% more capacity from the TF4. TF4 is not published and I do not know what is in it or why it has more capacity but I do know that it does. If TF4 was closer to the cost of TF3, I would buy it rather than mix my own. It does go further. I cannot comment on Kodak stated capacities, I know there are some lurking here that have intimate knowledge of Kodak formulations - I Dump any of my fixer when it takes longer than 60 seconds to clear film. I have seen my prints yellow in several years from the early days and am not willing to risk that kind of embarassment. Fresh TF3 will clear film in 30 seconds. At 60 seconds clear time, there is not more than one more printing session of capacity left for me and I dump it. Maybe I could squeze more out of it but why? Too risky in the long run. I use 1:4 for both film and paper. I do 80% fiber prints. I fix paper for over 2 minutes and film for 3 minutes. Fresh TF3 has a ph of 8.0. This gives me a non acid process with short wash times for film or paper. I think I'll keep my scale and the TF3.
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  7. #27
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maine-iac
    I'm with Ole. My balance scale has sat unused for nearly 25 years, because I have not yet found a photo formula that needs such precision.
    Well Larry, I'm not with you. There are some formulas that need precision, and I use my balance for that. Film developers especially.

    But fixers don't need precision beyond the "one lump, two lumps" level. The process is not time-critical, and is supposed to go to completion. So I havent weighed out a fixer since I did it once to write down my recipe...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  8. #28
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie Brim
    Before I decide which size to buy, how long does the concentrate last once opened?
    I know that this question may seem stupid, but shipping is a two dollar difference between the larger bottle and the smaller bottle...I'd be stupid to buy the smaller bottle if the concentrate will last. So can someone kindly advise me?
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  9. #29
    Ole
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    Stephanie, it lasts.

    BUT: Mixing half a bottole of concentrate with water to make half a batch od fixer is not quite trivial". The concentrate is a bootle full of "goop" where the bottom half is almost solid. You have to get it mixed very very well before decanting off half of it...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    Stephanie, it lasts.

    BUT: Mixing half a bottole of concentrate with water to make half a batch od fixer is not quite trivial". The concentrate is a bootle full of "goop" where the bottom half is almost solid. You have to get it mixed very very well before decanting off half of it...
    YES, and that's another reason why I buy a gallon of 60% Ammonium Thiosulfate from Artcraft and mix my own Neutral Rapid Fixer (a liter at a time) - no undisolved TF-4 "goop" to contend with.
    Tom Hoskinson
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