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  1. #11
    Gene_Laughter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcsv View Post
    Has anyone else tried this?

    I tried it yesterday. I used the parodinal version that doesn't use potassium bromide. It gave out nicely toned prints on generic paper. I used 1:20 dilution and my usual water bath.

    I have used Rodinal at dilutions of 1 to 20 and even 1 to 30 for print developing for bromoil matrices.

    Gene

  2. #12
    marcsv's Avatar
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    here's another print from my first batch
    sample image

  3. #13
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    They're looking very low contrast to me.
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  4. #14
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcsv View Post
    Actually the next stage would be adding hydroquinone. The soup i used didn't use potassium bromide, I'm thniking of using by newest batch whech has about a gram of potassium bromide for every 250 ml. how would this affect the print?
    The potassium bromide would work as a restrainer (correct me if I am wrong), while the sodium ascorbate/hydroquinone would make it work, as said earlier, with greater strength.

    The prints look nice with a good tone, though it looks like they lack a bit in contrast (so hard to judge from a scan, onscreen!), it works well with the subject matter.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  5. #15
    marcsv's Avatar
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    hmm maybe I should try split-grade printing for my next batch, but i have to get m' hands on some VC paper first.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerevan View Post
    The potassium bromide would work as a restrainer (correct me if I am wrong), while the sodium ascorbate/hydroquinone would make it work, as said earlier, with greater strength.

    The prints look nice with a good tone, though it looks like they lack a bit in contrast (so hard to judge from a scan, onscreen!), it works well with the subject matter.
    I found a recipe indicating that potassium bromide lowers film fog, I'm just not quite sure how this would translate to enlarging paper, thanks for the hydroquinine tip.

  7. #17
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    Bromide works with paper as it does with film, but, but changes print color sometimes. It varies more or at least as much from developer to developer as from paper to paper to film etc. It's a matter of different strokes for different folks. Sometimes benzotriazole is called for. Most of us, I think, keep a saturated solution of KBr around so we can add a drop or two as the spirit moves.
    Gadget Gainer

  8. #18
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    There I go, but butting in againgain.
    Gadget Gainer

  9. #19
    marcsv's Avatar
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    KBr and print tone

    Quote Originally Posted by gainer View Post
    Bromide works with paper as it does with film, but, but changes print color sometimes. It varies more or at least as much from developer to developer as from paper to paper to film etc. It's a matter of different strokes for different folks. Sometimes benzotriazole is called for. Most of us, I think, keep a saturated solution of KBr around so we can add a drop or two as the spirit moves.
    I read form The Compact Photo Lab Index (Morgan and Morgan, 1977) that adding more KBr to a developer, like Ansco/Agfa for example, gives the print a warmer tone. I wonder if it does the same for my version of PAP HCl. Also I mixed a new batch of PAP HCl, this time I included about 2.5 grams of Hydroquinone. Actually its starting to look like to Kodak's D-8 (which I understand, gives more contrast).

    Only one way to find out...more film and darkroom tests.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcsv View Post
    Has anyone else tried this?

    I tried it yesterday. I used the parodinal version that doesn't use potassium bromide. It gave out nicely toned prints on generic paper. I used 1:20 dilution and my usual water bath.
    The question is: Why?

    Commercial paper developers are dirt cheap and have so far, at least for me, been easily available.

    Sincerely,

    Hany.

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