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  1. #11
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    Hi Robert, what follows is what I do for print developer...negative developer I use 'one shot'.

    Boxed wine bags work for me; the mylar (or is it aluminized plastic?) 4 litre bags with the removable soft brown plastic spigot. I made a little jig to put the bag in while filling which holds the hard plastic opening up. After filling I put on the spigot, open the pour spout, and push out all the air until the developer just reaches the top. No air. No light. No problem

    Are you talking about negative developer concentrate, stock solution, or working solution?

    Murray
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Does anyone here have any thoughts about using the recyclable plastic pop (aka soda) bottles? Would there be any advantage to using the Seven-Up (green) bottles as compared to the cola (clear) bottles?
    If you store processing chemicals in darkroom, cabinet, etc., the color of the bottle is unimportant. What's more important are the material (use PET or PETE with recycle code 1), and caps lined with polyethylene, teflon or nylon to ensure good fit. If you still have a choice, use bottles with thicker walls.

    Large soda bottles are usually very think and flimsy. Some bottled waters are made from more reusable and oxygen-tight material.

    Another good material is HDPE lined with teflon. These multilayer bottles are increasingly common for pasturized juice products with long shelf life. Other than Tropicana with recycle code of 7 (other) for such bottles, they are not very obvious to untrained eyes. Even those Tropicana bottles may change, since the code 7 is unpopular among recycle advocates.

    Good fit of caps is very important. For best results, use rigid cap with soft lining on bottle made of a rigid material. Most PET bottles have thicker, rigid neck and rather rigid cap. But many polyethylene bottles are softer and the cap may pop even if screwed tight. If you overtighten, the cap may crack as well.

    What's unfortunate is that many photo chemical manufacturers ship chemicals in HDPE bottles. I think it's not the best practice, but obviously this seems to be the most preferred material in terms of lowest chance of damage in transportation.
    Last edited by Ryuji; 11-05-2006 at 02:50 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Budding View Post
    I'm looking for ideas to extend the shelf life of open film developers.
    A couple of ideas: What's important is the surface-to-air/volume ratio. Small surface, large volume = long storrage life. So fill the bottle all the way to the brim. If the bottle is only partially filled, you can substitue the air with any gas that does not contain oxygen. "Dust-off" works fine. And keep the bottle upside down - then the developer itself will seal the cap.

    j-fr

    www-j-fr.dk

  4. #14

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    I have seen Murray's idea of wine boxes mentioned before and have looked at wine boxes in the U.K. With all the makes of boxes I have seen there's seems to be no way of taking out the pouring spout, then cleaning the bag and re-filling.

    Does anyone in the U.K. know of a wine box which meets the requirements?

    pentaxuser

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neal View Post
    Dear Robert,

    The solution to your problem is to make more photographs. The shelf life problem disappears. ;>)

    Neal Wydra
    I'm making quite a few photos. I use D76 to develop the HP5 that I shoot most of the time. But I do use DDX whenever I shoot Delta 3200 (which isn't too often). Maybe I should test HP5 in DDX and just use one developer.

  6. #16

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    Dear Robert,

    "I'm making quite a few photos."

    I hope that my little quip didn't cause any offense. None was intended. I must admit that if I had a separate developer for the times I use the 3200 films, much would be wasted. I would check to see if there is a local surplus store. There is one close to me called American Science and Surplus that usually has laboratory storage bottles. While I normally don't like glass (I can be clumsy at times) I have purchased glass "safety" bottles with a plastic coating to contain the glass and contents in case it is dropped.

    For use with HP5+ you may be able to dilute it beyond the recommended 1+4 in an effort to come closer to the look of D-76. That is essentially the way I use Xtol.

    Neal Wydra

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryuji View Post
    Good fit of caps is very important.
    That bears underlining. How many times, years ago,
    I'd check a cap and find it loose. Not so with Polyseal
    or Polycone equipped caps. Those are caps with, I'd
    guess, a PE cork insert. The cap does not actually
    seat but as it is tightened the cork is inserted.
    I can't imagine a more sure seal.

    They are sized for most or all Boston Rounds,
    clear or amber, narrow or wide mouth. Glass
    Boston Rounds are NOT expensive. Dan

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neal View Post
    Dear Robert,

    "I'm making quite a few photos."

    I hope that my little quip didn't cause any offense. None was intended. I must admit that if I had a separate developer for the times I use the 3200 films, much would be wasted. I would check to see if there is a local surplus store. There is one close to me called American Science and Surplus that usually has laboratory storage bottles. While I normally don't like glass (I can be clumsy at times) I have purchased glass "safety" bottles with a plastic coating to contain the glass and contents in case it is dropped.

    For use with HP5+ you may be able to dilute it beyond the recommended 1+4 in an effort to come closer to the look of D-76. That is essentially the way I use Xtol.

    Neal Wydra
    No offense at all! Everyone who has replied has been helpful.

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