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Thread: HC110 Agitation

  1. #11
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Following a manufacturer's recommendations gets you highly reliable negatives that print normal scenes at the normal paper grade at normal times.

    Normal doesn't mean mundane, Kodak and the others have worked hard to make normal a very high quality situation.

    Before you or I decide on changing away from normal development (time, temp, or agitation) we probably need to have a situation that's not normal that's pushing us that way. For example Ansel Adams used graded paper which made adjusting the negative important, but he also was meticulous about measuring the scene; changes in development were driven by real numbers not somebody elses preferences.

    We also need to remember that adjustments don't necessarily need to be done at the film. Today, unlike in Adams heyday, VC papers are great and contrast is easily and nicely adjustable with paper grade.

    I'd suggest starting normal and defining where you want to go from there.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Following a manufacturer's recommendations gets you highly reliable negatives that print normal scenes at the normal paper grade at normal times.

    Normal doesn't mean mundane, Kodak and the others have worked hard to make normal a very high quality situation.

    Before you or I decide on changing away from normal development (time, temp, or agitation) we probably need to have a situation that's not normal that's pushing us that way. For example Ansel Adams used graded paper which made adjusting the negative important, but he also was meticulous about measuring the scene; changes in development were driven by real numbers not somebody elses preferences.

    We also need to remember that adjustments don't necessarily need to be done at the film. Today, unlike in Adams heyday, VC papers are great and contrast is easily and nicely adjustable with paper grade.

    I'd suggest starting normal and defining where you want to go from there.
    Sure, and for me it will be very very long journey in film as i don't have tools to print and surrounded by digi... and also my country is not supporting film much and i can't spend a lot of money to buy chemicals or tools or paper always online as i do usually, sooner or later it will get harder for me to have great work in film for me against budget/time, i can start somewhere for sure, but i can't tell how and when i can end up somewhere else i want to.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peterpan View Post
    In Greg Mironchuk's article he states that he only agitates at the beginning of development process and once half way through the process.The reason being that to agitate more makes the negs too contrasty.
    That's what HE does based on HIS development process. Fist follow Kodak's recomendation they know more about their films than anyone else. If YOU find a need for any adjustment then base it on Kodak's agitation method.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

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  4. #14
    bvy
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    I recently developed some Acros which I shot between 80 and 100. I used dilution H for 9 minutes. I agitated in a Paterson tank, continuous (inversion) for the first minute, then two inversion at minutes 2, 4 and 6. I read that less agitation would allow the shadows to develop and would keep the highlights from becoming too dense.

    Indeed, that's what happened! I have a lot of contrast in the shadows (no clear areas of film in any frame, really) but practically no highlights (no black areas of film in any frame, really). Could not agitating every minute have had that great an effect on not allowing the highlights to build any real density?

    By the way, this was a single roll of 120 film developed in 9.5ml of HC-110 syrup + 600ml of water. Thanks.

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    No expert on this but, I would have went to about 11-12 minutes on the time with that dilution and agitation method.

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    Quote Originally Posted by juan View Post
    ....
    That said, I think most folks tend to follow an agitation scheme similar to what Kodak recommends - every 30-seconds or every minute. I'd recommend picking one of those and developing a lot of film constantly that way until you know enough about the results you're getting to know what you want to change - if anything.
    juan
    This is good advice. I use HC-110 and the "Ilford agitation" method of 4 gentle inversions at the start of each minute. But the most important thing is to be as consistent as possible so that when you make adjustments for your printing you will home in on the contrast for best printing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NedL View Post
    This is good advice. I use HC-110 and the "Ilford agitation" method of 4 gentle inversions at the start of each minute. But the most important thing is to be as consistent as possible so that when you make adjustments for your printing you will home in on the contrast for best printing.
    Yes! Consistency is probably the most important thing. I typically use Dilution H (1+63) agitating for the first 30 secs (with some thumps to dislodge air bubbles), then 5 inversions in about 5 seconds each minute; generally around 9 minutes or so depending on specific film and temperature. But different folks are looking for different things; ultimately you need to figure out what works to get you what you want. Then by doing it the same way every time, you'll get what you want every time -- see!!!

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    I have been using the JBrunner 1+49 (1:50) dilution, agitating for first 30 seconds and then two inversions every 30 seconds thereafter. Works great for me. Here's the link:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum223/...de-simple.html

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvy View Post
    I recently developed some Acros which I shot between 80 and 100. I used dilution H for 9 minutes. I agitated in a Paterson tank, continuous (inversion) for the first minute, then two inversion at minutes 2, 4 and 6. I read that less agitation would allow the shadows to develop and would keep the highlights from becoming too dense.

    Indeed, that's what happened! I have a lot of contrast in the shadows (no clear areas of film in any frame, really) but practically no highlights (no black areas of film in any frame, really). Could not agitating every minute have had that great an effect on not allowing the highlights to build any real density?

    By the way, this was a single roll of 120 film developed in 9.5ml of HC-110 syrup + 600ml of water. Thanks.
    What does the midrange contrast look like? Lots of grays overall or is it overall fairly contrasty?

    In my experience, I've noted that reducing agitation mainly affects midtones and pulls down highlights, what other people might call "snap" or overall/global contrast. Useful for bright sunny days like we get a lot of here in San Diego but less helpful if the scenes are lower contrast.
    “One of the illusions of life is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive hour."

  10. #20
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    I was wondering about this as well. When I shoot HP-5 or Tri-X at 400 it's usually on an overcast day. Bright sunny days get an ASA 200 and about a two minute underdevelopment compared to shooting at 400 to compensate for the contrasty day.

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