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Thread: HC110 Agitation

  1. #1

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    HC110 Agitation

    I have decided to start using HC 110 the goo type for its keeping property.
    I have read several articles on the use of HC110,and of the different dilutions.
    Kodak suggest vigorous agitation,of 5 secs at start and then every 30secs.
    In Greg Mironchuk's article he states that he only agitates at the beginning of development process and once half way through the process.The reason being that to agitate more makes the negs too contrasty.
    Has anyone got any other thoughts on the subject.

  2. #2
    juan's Avatar
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    The subject of agitation is very deep - there are advocates of many dilutions of HC-110 and many agitation schemes. Just search HC-110 on this site. Generally one balances exposure with development dilution and agitation to get the desired contrast. As I say, you have a lot of reading to do.

    That said, I think most folks tend to follow an agitation scheme similar to what Kodak recommends - every 30-seconds or every minute. I'd recommend picking one of those and developing a lot of film constantly that way until you know enough about the results you're getting to know what you want to change - if anything.
    juan

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    I suggest the Mr Mironchuk argue the point with Kodak.

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    Agitation is another of those personal choices. Changing agitation randomly can cause major changes in the contrast of your negatives. Having made a choice, you need to stick with it like glue, making it part of the process that you follow religiously.

    I have standardized on HC110, dilution B, for roll film, and my agitation is continuous for the first 30 seconds, and 5 seconds out of every thirty thereafter. Also, I agitate very vigorously (some friends are actually frightened at how vigorously I agitate!). But it works for me. My development times tend to be shorter than what most people use - 4min 30sec for roll film, for example. Quick and simple.

    I also use HC110 for sheet film, dilution H (dilution B with twice the normal amount of water). I use a slosher in a tray, with continuous gentle agitation for the first 30 seconds followed by 5 sec out of 30 thereafter. My development time for sheets is longer than for rolls - 11 minutes. The main advantage (for me) is that it gives me maneuvering room for N-1 and N-2 development without having the time become so short that I have to worry about uneven development.

    The procedure that you attribute to Mr. Mironchuk sound like "minimal agitation", or "semi-stand development". That's also a process that works, but the developer usually is highly dilute, and the development time is also much longer. I've done that with Rodinal, 1:100, with a one-hour development time for both rolls and sheets. The advantage of that approach is better detail and local contrast. The disadvantage is that it is very boring.

    My point is that all of these work very well. None is absolutely better than any other - and it comes down to what you are trying to accomplish, and what you find to be pleasing results.
    Louie

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    For a look at Mr. Mironchuk's approach to B&W film development, look at http://www.mironchuk.com/hc-110.html

    He indicates that he uses HC-110 dilution A and Dilution B.

    He does not give any agitation method detail - no detailed agitation procedure descriptions. IMO. what he describes may well be a form of Minimal Agitation development, and may be congruent with semi-stand development.

    Mr. Mironchuk wrote:"I, personally, only agitate one or twice during development, because I want to be gentle to my precious film." "If you are a constant or frequent agitator, your times will need to be signifigantly (sic) shortened, and your overall contrast may be "skewed"... with your film exibiting high contrast in the highlight areas, and low contrast in the shadow areas. I like my negatives to have higher contrast in the shadows, and lower contrast in the highlights... so I don't agitate very much. If the negatives are too thin, then I extend the overall time... I do NOT increase agitation."
    Last edited by Tom Hoskinson; 11-16-2006 at 03:05 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: I was being logically inconsistent.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    My intentions are to use HC110 dilution H as dilution B the times are very short for films like NEW Tri-X Pan (400TX) (Kodak recommended) 3.75 mins, and with dilution H the time would be 6-7 mins,wich for me would be a more manageable time
    Peter

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    The times Kodak recommends are generally thought to be incorrect for use by most people. Most folks are using their old Tri-X times - somewhere in the neighborhood of 6 minutes for dilution B.
    juan

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    If I was still using HC-110 I would use dilution H or an even higher dilution to give me longer development times that are more consistent with minimal agitation techniques.

    6-7 minutes is a very short development time.

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/j24/j24.pdf
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson View Post
    For a look at Mr. Mironchuk's approach to B&W film development, look at http://www.mironchuk.com/hc-110.html

    He indicates that he uses HC-110 dilution A and Dilution B.

    He does not give any agitation method detail - no detailed agitation procedure descriptions. IMO. what he describes may well be a form of Minimal Agitation development, and may be congruent with semi-stand development.

    Mr. Mironchuk wrote:"I, personally, only agitate one or twice during development, because I want to be gentle to my precious film." "If you are a constant or frequent agitator, your times will need to be signifigantly (sic) shortened, and your overall contrast may be "skewed"... with your film exibiting high contrast in the highlight areas, and low contrast in the shadow areas. I like my negatives to have higher contrast in the shadows, and lower contrast in the highlights... so I don't agitate very much. If the negatives are too thin, then I extend the overall time... I do NOT increase agitation."
    This update post is mainly for others who happen to come across it while searching. He also said: "All that being said... I use a different dilution of HC-110, other than "A" (1/15), or "B"(1/31). I use a dilution of 1/63... or HALF the strength of Dilution "B"."

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    Sooner or later after i develop HP5+ @800 in HC-110, i will start to test few films with HC-110 at box speed, in my mind i want to test the followings:
    TMAX100 &400, Tri-X400, Acros100, Delta 100/400 and last HP5+, all at box speed without push/pull.
    I used Dil B when i developed Tri-X @1600, will use same for HP5+ @800, then later i will decide if i should go with dil B or H if i have to follow Kodak dev chart table and given is very short for certain films.

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