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  1. #11

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    I seem to remember that safelight conditions were/are recommended. Never bothered tho' and never seemed to have any problems with the lights on.

  2. #12
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    One more thing: If you plan to do this a lot, buying chemicals in bulk are --in my opinion-- really the way to go. They are really cheap and last a good long while. I would give the Artcraft or the formulary a call.

    When will you post some images?
    Robert Hall
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    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  3. #13
    reellis67's Avatar
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    Just be sure to keep your unexposed paper away from those fumes as they can fog anything - film or paper - that is exposed to it.

    - Randy

  4. #14
    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    Yes.. I know about the fumes. I will probably try one of the less smelly toners. I had to do this in the garage, and it will just get too cold to work out there in the coming months, so I will try the Fotospeed Sepia next, and if I want to keep pursuing this, then I will buy the chemistry in bulk. Seems like a good idea.

    With that said, I uploaded a sepia toned print, which, I think looks a little too purple. I have several more versions of this print to try, so I will experiment with different times and dilutions. And with a few other papers.

    I must say, that despite the stink, this was an absolute blast, and I can't wait to find that perfect sepia tone for my photographs.

    It was in the bleach for a fair bit, I would say about four or five minutes, and about the same in the toner. I will start with Bob Carnie's dilution suggestions, and any other comments for times or dilutions are always appreciated.

    Here is a scan of my print.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Suzanne Revy View Post
    I know about the fumes.
    Well I don't know about the fumes. Very odd and I've no
    explanation. Sodium sulfide hydrate; that's what it says on
    my packet of Kodak Sepia Toner. Apparently it is sulfide
    with some retained H2O, no more no less.

    A few days ago I failed for a second time to detect any
    fumes upon mixing some 1.6% sodium sulfide ST-1 test
    solution. That's the test for residual silver. Scary, my
    nose may no longer know; be immune though I think
    not. A few added drops of vinegar may tell. Dan

  6. #16
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    The fumes are hydrogen sulfide. It smells like rotten eggs and fogs photographic emulsions.
    Jerold Harter MD

  7. #17
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter View Post
    The fumes are hydrogen sulfide. It smells like rotten eggs and fogs photographic emulsions.
    Indeed. Reminds me of a joke:
    "I say, I say, I say, I say: my dog's got no nose"

    "Your dog's got no nose? How does he smell?"

    "Bloody awful... - ... but he can still smell hydrogen sulphide"...
    If you can't smell H2S, check in the mirror that you still have a nose - it may have dropped off when you weren't looking

    Cheers, Bob.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Suzanne Revy View Post
    SNIP It was in the bleach for a fair bit, I would say about four or five minutes, and about the same in the toner. I will start with Bob Carnie's dilution suggestions, and any other comments for times or dilutions are always appreciated.
    Here is a scan of my print.
    OK. here's mine ...
    For bleach:
    I was doing bleach and 2nd pass Lith dev all day yesterday and for this I used a 50% bleach solution (on warmtone paper) as I wanted to bleach everything except the blacks, which i want to come through in the final images as black.
    For split sepia toning I prefer to tone just mid tones up and for a warmtone paper I will use a 20% solution and a timer. If I want to warm up just the highlights I use a 10% soln. Cold tone papers may need stronger solutions, certainly longer times.
    For toner:
    I see no point in using this at anything less than full strength. It can only tone what has been bleached and toning should always IMHO be taken to completion, with controls being applied at the bleach stage, otherwise you leave untoned/developed halides in the print. If unfixed, these are unstable. If fixed, the print will lighten and tones will be lost. The only exception here is for a partial redev and fixed effect, which has its own look but is not what most people want from their toning.
    Any 'beneficial' effects from diluting the toner can can acheived by other means that don't leave an unstable print.
    Tim

  9. #19
    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    Tim, I have been reading your toning book, and you covered this subject so thoroughly, that all the information can be a bit daunting. Getting specific information here on APUG from you as I actually teach myself the process is enormously helpful, and I'm feeling slightly more knowledgeable as a result.

    Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

  10. #20
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    If you can't smell H2S, check in the mirror that you still have a nose - it may have dropped off when you weren't looking
    Just a quick note about this, having experienced the joy of doing some work in paper mills. The nose can detect extremely low levels of H2S, however, as the concentration rises, it can disable your sense of smell. As the stuff is lethal at higher concentrations, caution and good ventilation is in order.

    A process manager at one of the mills put it in succinct terms related to being in the mill:

    "If you can't smell it, you're dead."

    They carried a little pager-sized sensor on the belt that would beep above some preset level. There were certain locations where you did not go without someone with a sensor.

    DaveT

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