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  1. #1
    patrickjames's Avatar
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    Chemistry Scales?

    Can anyone recommend a good place to get a chemistry scale and a good one to buy?

  2. #2
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    Do a search, there are a few good threads about it, but I use a mechanical scale, an Ohaus triple beam balance, good for up to 2610 grams (with extra weights), with an accuracy of 0.1 gram. Mine is without the extra weights, so it works to 610 grams. Others may have other preferences.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  3. #3
    Will S's Avatar
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    I just got this:
    Item Name: Acculab EC-211 Portable Scale [210g x 0.1g]
    Item Number: EC211

    or maybe this one would do - I'm not sure how big it is:
    http://balance.balances.com/scales/853

    Best,

    Will
    "I am an anarchist." - HCB
    "I wanna be anarchist." - JR

  4. #4
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will S View Post
    or maybe this one would do - I'm not sure how big it is:
    http://balance.balances.com/scales/853
    I'm using an older version of that - up to 200g, 0.1g precision. It works - and works well enough for darkroom use.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  5. #5

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    I have a little digital pocket scale. 200 grams, accurate to +/- 0.1 gram. 200 is fine for small formulas, but if I got another one, I'd want it capable of up to 500 grams.

    Oh, you do get what you pay for. I had a cheap digital model which had sensitivity all over the place while it just sat there. 63 grams, no, 62. No, 65. Wait, 61. Grrrr. Look for a model with a calibration weight included - those are nice to check accuracy.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will S View Post
    I just got this:
    Item Name: Acculab EC-211 Portable Scale [210g x 0.1g]
    Item Number: EC211 Best, Will
    I've an Acculab from five years ago and working
    perfectly. I've found it's 200 gram capacity, .01 gram
    resolution and accuracy a best combination. That many
    grams will see you through just about any full liter of stock
    or concentrate you will likely ever come across. The .01
    gram resolution will handle those very small amounts of
    this or that often encountered. Also very nice to have
    when experimenting or working with less than full
    amounts when preparing fractional batches. Dan

  7. #7
    reellis67's Avatar
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    I was able to get an Ohaus tipple-beam scale on ebay for $25 in good shape, bit it took a little patience. They can be had for a bit more any dey of the week though if you want one now. Personally, I prefer the mechanical scale, but there are good digital scales out there.

    - Randy

  8. #8
    gainer's Avatar
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    A scale used by those who load cartridges can be had at sporting good shops. Some will have both the gram scales and the grain scales. A gram is 15.28 grains IIRC. The capacity is not great, but is enough for most of the chemicals that need accurate weighing. These are usually balances. Larger amounts can be weighed with sufficient precision on kitchen spring scales.

    You have discovered from a previous post the difference between accuracy and precision. A scale may read to 0.001 grams but not be accurate to 1 gram.
    Gadget Gainer

  9. #9
    noseoil's Avatar
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    Pat, still remember that one from school. Accuracy is hitting the x-ring one time. Precision is being able to do it every time. I bought an Ohaus tripple beam balance (new) on the internet from a scale dealer a few years back. It is the stripped down model without weights, but it works well enough for my use. I think it was about $85 with shipping.

    I was surprised to see how many digital scales were out there, and how few were analog types. Being middle age, I chose the older type and have been happy ever since. Nice to use one which you can actually see the amounts on a scale. My powder measure won't go up as far as I need at times. Don't usually reload for artillery, largest is just the puny 375 H&H. tim

  10. #10
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    I have an Australian version of the Ohaus triple beam which is capable of 610g or 2610 with the extra weights.

    I bought it new about 15 years ago, was a brilliant decision.

    Recently with my business, I bought another process which required measuring to 0.01gm accuracy. Well the process came with electronic scales and my first thought was that I could use these for photographic chemicals.

    This I duly did, but after using them for about three months, I went back to the analogue scales. I cannot explain why, but the analogue scales are more user friendly, even if I have to screw the superfine adjuster in or out to zero in, for each plastic measuring cup I use.

    I think it comes down to the way one can tap, tap the measuring spoon slightly, allowing more chemicals to drop and at the same time, watch the sway of the beam as it gets closer and closer to zero.

    Mick.
    Last edited by Mick Fagan; 12-09-2006 at 07:58 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Spelling

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