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  1. #1

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    Dupont Superior 4 B&W pancromatic film

    At the local antique shop, I found, (and purchased) a NEW and UNOPENED 100 foot can of this film dated 1959. Before I open it and give it a try, Is there anyone that believes it may have more value in its unopened state? I'm sure the base fog has increased a little bit, and it may deliver some very interesting images, but I'm curious as to what it will do.

  2. #2
    Alex Bishop-Thorpe's Avatar
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    100ft of interesting never hurt anyone I don't think it'd be of particular worth except to other photographers, and a number of them would probably be looking to shoot it as well. But I've seen old empty Ilford Paper boxes sold for $20 here, so who knows. I'd use it, given the chance.
    The Analogue Laboratory, or 'so you built a darkroom in an old factory in the industrial zone'.
    Blog thing!.

    Worry less. Photograph more.

  3. #3

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    Dupont Superior 4 B&W pancromatic film UPDATE

    Well the deed has been done. I coaxed myself to open the new (old) sealed can, wound a 36 exp roll and shot it outside. Developed with D76 for 8 minutes at 70 deg F and was extreemly surprised at the results. The first several inches were slightly fogged but gradually cleared up and a foot later revealed amazing beautiful negs. Very nice, clear base and great d-max. Printed on Illford mg needed just the slightest addition of magenta to make great prints. Estimated effective speed is about 150-200 using an 8 stop bracket and developing times. With old film, sometimes you win and others not. This time I got lucky.

  4. #4
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cruzingoose View Post
    Well the deed has been done. I coaxed myself to open the new (old) sealed can, wound a 36 exp roll and shot it outside. Developed with D76 for 8 minutes at 70 deg F and was extreemly surprised at the results. The first several inches were slightly fogged but gradually cleared up and a foot later revealed amazing beautiful negs. Very nice, clear base and great d-max. Printed on Illford mg needed just the slightest addition of magenta to make great prints. Estimated effective speed is about 150-200 using an 8 stop bracket and developing times. With old film, sometimes you win and others not. This time I got lucky.
    I think that is pretty cool!
    Don Bryant

  5. #5
    Neanderman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cruzingoose View Post
    amazing beautiful negs...
    Care to share? An image, I mean, not film. (Though some people might ask for film, too. )

    Ed
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  6. #6

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    Wouldn't mind sharing film either. You can bulk load some rolls and sell them to other photographers or give away for the cost of shipping. Some people would be interested to see how 50 year old film behave. There may be nostalgia value too. Some people might have shot that DuPont film in the fifties in their romantic years.

  7. #7
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Sperior #2 and #4 bring back memories from the 40's. They were the only films easily available during the war. #2 had a Weston rating of 50, and #4 a Weston rating of 200. They were sold in 27 1/2 ft lengths which were cut almost through at the appopriate length for 36 exposures. At each juncture the leader was properly cut and attached to the appropriately cut tail of the previous length. No bulk loader was needed, or available.

    I used an immense amount of these films in high school.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  8. #8

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    Sounds like a great idea. I'll share my experience of working with 50 year old film by a trade of sorts. But in order to satisfy the many of you that may want to participate, I'll send one 15 exposure roll to anyone who sends me a roll of 35 or 120 B&W film of any speed or brand. I would like to keep this within the lower 48 (US). I know 15 exposures is not a lot, but with this limited supply I would like as many APUGers as possible to share the experience. Due to postage cost, I'd like to keep it in the lower 48 and return shipping by USPS Parcel Post. Here is an image of the can taken with my 10 year old digital camera. My ship to can be found in my profile. If there is any personal questions please PM.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dupont.jpg  

  9. #9

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    Superior 4 was DuPont's high speed motion picture film. I shot some of it back in the 1960s. It's pretty good, with reasonably fine grain. But watch out for the contrast and avoid overdevelopment. Test by bracketing exposures around ISO 250. You may need to use benzotriazole in the developer for film this old.

  10. #10

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    No benzotriazole needed

    QUOTE=nworth;608993]Superior 4 was DuPont's high speed motion picture film. I shot some of it back in the 1960s. It's pretty good, with reasonably fine grain. But watch out for the contrast and avoid overdevelopment. Test by bracketing exposures around ISO 250. You may need to use benzotriazole in the developer for film this old.[/QUOTE]


    Good practice, but after two rolls shot from this batch, I like it as it is. The film base density compares to my other current B&W films and any fog it may have is minimal. At this point I am sure the film was optimally stored and it survived its long hibernation. It reminds me of Kodak Super XX which was and still is my all time favorite. If I can find more I'll still buy it.

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