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  1. #1
    marsbars's Avatar
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    Understanding dr.5 Process

    I have been looking at trying a couple of rolls in the dr.5 process as I prefer slides over negatives. The thing that I am having trouble getting my head around is if I am shooting Pan F iso 50 they recommend shooting it at iso 25. After reading a bunch of the different film reviews I noticed that they recommend a rather large overexposure for the films they list as good in the process. Could someone help me to understand why overexposure is desired to get BW film. Some of the suggested iso's end up with up to 2 stops OE. This might be a simple explanation but I haven't figured it out yet.
    "There is something about the mystery
    of what is on a roll of film that keeps
    me shooting, none of that digital
    instant gratification for me."

  2. #2
    dr5chrome's Avatar
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    hello;

    I can give you a quick summery;

    Think of all the film we run as new films. The process changes all the films run in the process. you must also remember to shoot as you would E6, as a positive. Don't shoot as you would a negative.

    Depending on the reversal B&W process, most require more exposure than the factory speed.

    many of the films run in dr5 can be exposed at the factory speed, HP5, FP4, TX TMAX100, all the EFKE films, are examples.

    PANf is one of those films that need an adjustment. Normal for this film is 20-25 iso. You can shoot this film to 10iso to give better detail in deep shadow. PANf can have up an 11 stop range in this process without loosing detail in the blacks or the whites. 32-80iso will produce higher than normal contrast and might become difficult to scan.

    dw

    www.dr5.com

  3. #3
    Paul Sorensen's Avatar
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    I don't know a great deal about the dr5 process, but remember that any change in developer can change the effective speed of the film. What you see on the box is merely the company's suggestion for the correct film speed. You may find that a different speed will be appropriate for a different developer. Since dr5 is basically a different developer, one that happens to create positives rather than negatives, there will be a recommended film speed that will possibly differ from box speed.

  4. #4
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The dr-5 process itself is not unique and it is quite easy to reversal process B&W film yourself at home. There are various commercial kits available and also many excellent published formulae.

    There is much less call now for B&W slides, 30 or 40 years ago they were very common as teaching aids in schools etc, some of us remember the old filmstrip projectors :-)

    However saying that people still want B&W slides and dr5 as acompany is offering a controlled processing line to ensure consistant results, that in itself is fairly uniwue as the only other similar lines were dedicated to Agfa Scala.

    Ian

  5. #5
    Hervé V.'s Avatar
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    reversal process is not easy, with a kit or with personal receipt . you'll have to ruin a lot of films before the first good results appear .
    Dr5 has a stabilised process that gives constant results, it's a good solution if you prefer use your time to take pictures than to make experiences in your lab

  6. #6
    dr5chrome's Avatar
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    ..i will have to correct you Ian. dr5 'is' unique. reversal processing 'is' common.
    recipe, procedure & machine make dr5 as unique as Kodachrome, as E6, as the scala process. They are all different, and unique.

    thanks, Paul. that is a very good Summation.

    dw

    www.dr5.com



    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    The dr-5 process itself is not unique and it is quite easy to reversal process B&W film yourself at home. There are various commercial kits available and also many excellent published formulae.


    Ian

  7. #7

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    In the case of foma 200 (the only film I've had the chance to test in dr5 so far), it runs at 200 in dr5 in spite of the fact that it is normally considered a 125 speed negative film in normal developers. So some films gain rather than lose speed in dr5.

    Since this thread has Mr. Wood's attention, I'd like to ask a few questions myself. At what speed should I rate lucky 100 for a test? I'd also like to try another normal 200 speed film, how does the grain of foma 200 compare with neopan 400 and delta 400? Thanks.

  8. #8

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    Just wanted to add into this thread that I got back some Ilford HP5+ from DR5 recently. I shot both a 120 roll, and a roll of 35mm. Since I have shot HP5+ normally as a negative film, I can state that the tonal range is different with processing this film in DR5 than it is from more normal processing as negatives. I went exactly on the DR5 recommendations for ISO, and I am pleased with the results.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio

  9. #9
    marsbars's Avatar
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    Thanks all for the explanations. Guess I will have to give it a try.
    "There is something about the mystery
    of what is on a roll of film that keeps
    me shooting, none of that digital
    instant gratification for me."

  10. #10
    Rick Olson's Avatar
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    Marsbars ... I too have used this process for the past few years, mostly with HP-5. In fact, my avatar is an HP-5 image processed using DR-5. I photograph steam railroads and it's a real treat to shoot HP-5 at 800-1000 and get the great detail when dealing with the motion of steam trains. I have also used other film for still shots (Efke 25, Ilford FP-4) and the images were spectacular. Try a random lot of film to test out the tonal range and then send it off to DR-5. This way you can select the film that gives you the "look" you want. This is fun stuff. Good luck!!

    Rick

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