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  1. #11

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    From the grumpy old man...

    Quote Originally Posted by bruce terry View Post
    Also test 400TX. Excellent for interiors @ iso800
    Sorry to be the grumpy old man, but 400 TX is ISO 400 andonly ISO 400. Everything else is EI, shadow detals or not.

    j-fr

    www.j-fr.dk

  2. #12
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bruce terry View Post
    I suppose since "fast" mono films hold up so well upped just one stop, and you can easily drop the 1600s to 800, there's never been a market for iso800.
    Oddly enough, in the 1950s and 1960s, there seemed to be a market for this - Ilford had HPS (800 ASA), Agfa had Isopan Record (ASA 1000), Kodak had Royal X Pan (ASA 1250). As I recall, these films had full speed, quite good gradation, the expected moderate contrast and very coarse grain (Fuji Neopan 1600 is probably the closest modern equivalent). They were marketed in rollfilm form partly as a means of taking pictures in poor light with box cameras. It must have been due to lack of demand that they were discontinued, but why this was, I don't know.

    Regards,

    David

  3. #13
    johnnywalker's Avatar
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    I thought that Microphen and DD-X were both speed increasing developers and have similar formulations. Not so?

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post

    HP5 Plus is ISO 650 in speed increasing developers such as Microphen and as Robert says Fuji's 1600 is 800 in DD-X or the like. TMZ is ISO 800-1000 in most developerts and Delta 3200 is ISO 1000-1200 in most developers.

    Cheers,

    R.
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

  4. #14

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    My understanding is that Ilford Delta 3200 is actually an ISO 800 film and is designed to be pushed.

    Bob

  5. #15
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Here's a hint from Ilford's data sheet:

    "DELTA 3200 Professional has an ISO speed rating
    of ISO 1000/31º (1000ASA, 31DIN) to daylight.
    The ISO speed rating was measured using ILFORD
    ID-11 developer at 20°C/68ºF with intermittent
    agitation in a spiral tank.
    It should be noted that the exposure index (EI)
    range recommended for DELTA 3200 Professional
    is based on a practical evaluation of film speed
    and is not based on foot speed, as is the ISO
    standard."


    and Kodak's words on TMZ:

    "The nominal speed is EI 1000 when the film is processed in KODAK PROFESSIONAL T-MAX Developer or KODAK PROFESSIONAL T-MAX RS Developer and Replenisher, or EI 800 when it is processed in other Kodak black-and-white developers. It was determined in a manner published in ISO standards."

    Which, roughly translated, means "If we gave it an ISO speed it would be 800 or 1000". (ISO 6 gives the film manufacturer the choice of developer to be used when doing speed tests.)

    Best,
    Helen
    Last edited by Helen B; 03-02-2007 at 11:31 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16
    erikg's Avatar
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    Helen has nailed it. So actually we have 3 800 speed films. There was more interest in the high speed end when press photographers were shooting b&w. When that market went to color, the demand fell way off. I also remember using Kodak Recording film (2475) a very grainy high speed film made for police work.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by j-fr View Post
    Sorry to be the grumpy old man, but 400 TX is ISO 400 andonly ISO 400. Everything else is EI, shadow detals or not.

    j-fr

    www.j-fr.dk
    No.

    ISO varies with developer. Tri-X goes from ISO 200 (or below) in fine grain developers to maybe ISO 500-650 in Microphen or DD-X.

    Cheers,

    R.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnywalker View Post
    I thought that Microphen and DD-X were both speed increasing developers and have similar formulations. Not so?
    It is so. Microphen generally gives a tiny bit more speed (from Ilford's own tests) but not even 1/3 stop. For all intents and purposes, the speeds are identical.

    Cheers,

    R.

  9. #19
    Harry Lime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    TMZ and Delta 3200 are really around ISO 800.
    According to Roger Hicks Delta 3200 is more like 1200 and performs best between 1200-2000 in something like DD-X. I tend to agree with this assessment.

  10. #20
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B View Post
    and Kodak's words on TMZ:

    "The nominal speed is EI 1000 when the film is processed in KODAK PROFESSIONAL T-MAX Developer or KODAK PROFESSIONAL T-MAX RS Developer and Replenisher, or EI 800 when it is processed in other Kodak black-and-white developers. It was determined in a manner published in ISO standards."
    When TMZ first hit the market I was printing B&W for a university lab. I had the manager enlarge this section of the Kodak tech sheet for TMZ, put yellow highlighter over the EI 800 section, and post it at the drop-off window to explain to customers why I couldn't print what they hadn't put on the film.

    Lee

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