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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    747
    I guess since I'll be starting with one sheet at a time I could just rock the tray?


  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Nuernberg, Germany
    Posts
    214
    With one sheet, rocking will be sufficient, though I do suggest you "get your hands wet" and do a "flip" every now and then just to get use o handling wet film. You'll quickly be moving on to several sheets in no time.
    - William Levitt

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    747
    It's going to depend on how many film holders come with what ever camera I end up with. Most of the ones I've been looking at are so old they don't take modern holders. That's fine with me. My first task is to learn how to load the holders-) Then to use the camera and then to get used to processing the film. If after that I feel the urge I can make the investment in something nicer.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    368
    View Camera magazine has a one page description of a foolproof tray processing method for sheet film. Call us and we will send a copy

    View Camera Magazine
    505-899-8054 m-f 8-5 Mountain Time


    steve simmons

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    97
    robert, I use a Paterson orbital processor in whch you can develop 4 off 5x4 negs at one time or 1 off 10"x8" neg.
    the tray consists of a bottom half with peg holes to seperate it into four sections, the top half is a light proof lid with inlets and outlets for filling and draining.
    the tray sits on a dome which when switched on rotates and tilts the tray for the process times, after loading the film the process is carried out in daylight.
    I bought the unit about 15 years ago for developing 10x8 cibachromes and only recently used it with 5x4 negs all of which have been ok.
    I dont know if you can still buy them new but I have seen them on UK ebay.
    I hope this helps.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Central Texas
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    67
    Hello, all of the posted methods will work fine once you get used to it. The method that I found the greatest success with for 4x5 film was to use several of the Combi Plan tanks lined up like a deep tank line. These tanks are fantastic for 4x5 film. I never had problems with uneven development. I felt that when processing more than a couple of 4x5s in a tray was difficult because I couldn't keep them all together(they're too small). The Combi Plan system keeps each sheet of film separate, nothing toaches except for the edges. But I did not like using these tanks as a daylight system. For me it just made a lot more since to use them lined up like deep tanks. If you only have one Combi Plan tank then just dump it with the top off and pour the next chemical in without trying to use the little funnels and stuff. When you get to the wash bath just fit a house over the lower outlet that comes with the tank and you have a great film washer built in.
    huh?

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