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  1. #1
    declark's Avatar
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    What films work well with HC-110?

    I've dug through the folders and have come up with a lot of good information regarding films, developers etc., but usually the question answered is something like "what developer does one use for a particular film...?" I would like to pose this question from the other direction and ask what films work well with HC-110?

    I am fairly new to B&W and have only invested so much in materials at this point; I would like to stick with HC-110 for now. If it matters, I am using 120 in a Pentax 645 and a 6X9 Agfa Billy Record and have found Tri-X 320 and 400 to do quite well, but would like to try other films that give good results in HC-110. Thanks in advance for any advice you might offer.

  2. #2
    bennoj's Avatar
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    I have not yet done it myself, but the B&W lab that I use when I want to be sure I don't ruin my negatives uses HC-110 on the Acros (EI 50) that I bring them in 120 and 4x5 and the negs are beautiful. I'm not sure which dilution they are using, however. I bought a bottle of HC-110 recently and hope to figure out how to get similar results on my own.
    Benno Jones
    Seattle, WA

  3. #3
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    It is very flexible- start with it.

    If you are just starting out, HC-110 will do you fine. It is a thick liquid concetrate that if undiluted, in a cool dim place last a very long time, like many years. Even once slightly briown it still does the job.

    The standard starting point for many films is found on the 'massive film development chart' - google it. HC-110, likely at dilution B, will in all likelyhood be one of the develioper listed.

    Frequently the tines for dilution B are too short to allow even development in a small tank. I do what some unoficcially call "Dilution H" in these cases - dilute it twice as much as Dil B, and then develop for twice as long as a starting point. Search for an article by Barry Thornton - The Unzone System for further simple to implement ways to bring the B&W film and printing process under control for you to get predictable results.

    There are thousands of developer options. Don't worry about them yet. Get the rest of your craft under control, using one developer for film, and HC-110, or the Ilford equivalent, will do just fine. They don't change characteristics like a gallon of mixed up D-76 can do for you over the course of a few months.

    Don't dilute the syrup into stock solutions like the instructions on the bottle suggests- this wioll start the oxygen deterioration process - the developing agent will pull the oxygen dissolved in the water and oxidize, rather than oxidize on the film like we want.

    Get a medicine syringe, like used to measure out medicine to young kids. It will be calibrated in 1-10ml or so. Dilute the required amount straight into the water for the working solutions. I got a litre bottle of the ilford stuff as part of an enlarger lot a few weeks ago from Craigslist. I calculated that it could make up something like 270 500ml working strengh solutions.

  4. #4
    Bobbo's Avatar
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    I use HC-110 in my Tri-X from ISO 400 to 1600 almost 100% of the time. Works just fine. I say 5 minutes at 68F and Dilution B instead of 3 1/2 like Kodak suggests.

  5. #5

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    The main advantage of HC110 is that it is cheap and long-lived. It is more than adequate with almost all films, but not especially remarkable with any.

    Cheers,

    R.

  6. #6
    BradS's Avatar
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    WHat films work well with HC-110?
    I think Tri-X is especially nice in HC-110. Some say they were made for each other but...I kinda doubt that.

  7. #7

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    HP5 Plus and FP4 Plus work very well in HC-110.

  8. #8

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    Good Evening,

    While I prefer T-Max developer for T-Max films, I have found that HC-110 works at least adequately and usually very well with just about any film I've ever tried it on. Mike's advice about diluting directly from the concentrate is right on-target. The ease of achieving different dilutions and the concentrate's longevity make HC-110 an excellent overall choice. Just be glad that today's HC-110 lacks the absolutely putrid smell of the HC-110 of a couple of decades ago.

    Konical

  9. #9

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  10. #10
    MenacingTourist's Avatar
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    I soup all my roll films in HC-110 and a Jobo. The times are FAST with a roller. Used to be JandC 100/400 but have run out and am using the Freestyle Arista.edu 100/400 until John gets back up and running. I get good results with both brands.



 

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