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  1. #11
    glbeas's Avatar
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    I suspect a fine mesh silkscreen, about 300 polyester and a sharp edge polyurethane squeegee might to a pretty good job applying emulsion. Only thing is if the emulsion can be kept at the right temp. I know silkscreen is realy good at applying inks and resists on flatwork using offcontact printing.
    Screen tension, mesh count, squeegee edge and stroke pressure are the main variables in this action.
    Gary Beasley

  2. #12
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    Gary;

    With an emulsion in gelatin, this will probably give a nice silk screen effect. Viscocity is an important factor as is surfactant. The lower the viscoscity the lower the silk screen effect.

    PE

  3. #13
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Yep. It would be an interesting experiment to see what kind of effect this would have with a print emulsion. Do you think an emulsion could be modified to smooth out well after screen application? A 300 mesh screen would give an extremely fine pattern which may not be objectionable in a print image.
    Gary Beasley

  4. #14
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    Gary;

    Yes, this is a rather trivial exercise. In fact, you will often see small coating defects that fill in or smooth out if the formula is correct (viscosity and surfactant effects). You could also make a formulation that retained the full silk effect.

    Of course, it is better to do it in the paper surface itself. I have coated on canvas and kept a rather nice canvas effect, but the rate of coating defects goes way up. Again, it depends on the formulation being laid down.

    When there were canvas, suede and silk finish papers, the finishes were made before the paper was coated.

    PE

  5. #15
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    I have logged hundreds of hours using a HVLP unit(s) (I like the "Croix" the best) and can offer a few general tips that might help you out here.

    One needs to thin the material out so as to get the proper flow. W/O knowing the viscosity of liquid light (or the makeup of it, I will yield to the everclear suggestion but be aware of the fire hazard created.

    What you have to do is first to turn the (unit)air on and just let it run for a few minutes to get it warmed up. This is important as that helps the "flow" of the material. While it is warming up, a great rule of thumb is to thin the material till you can put a stir stick in it and pull it out and hold it at a 45 degree angle resting on the rim of the bucket and watch the material run off of it .......... when it turns from a small stream to a drip you will want roughly one drip per second, that's perfect.

    Fill up the cup (I really would use a cup gun) and turn the air all the way down and set the fluid knob on the gun till the material comes out in a stream about 2 1/2" before it arcs down. You will have three settings on the tip of the gun ....... horizontal, vertical and round ......... use the round for the last step.

    Then turn on air to the unit and slowy dial it up till you get the proper pattern. You adjust the SIZE of the pattern by screwing the knurled outer ring holding the air tip in. Closer to the gun = wider pattern ........ Further from gun = narrower pattern.

    Maybe try out with some water first to see how everything works and practice a little with it so as not to turn the project into a fish fry!! Hope that helps.

    Good Luck,
    Mike
    "EVERY film and paper is good .......... for something"
    Phil Davis

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