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  1. #11

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    distilled water

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tapscott. View Post
    Would it be worthwhile making distilled water at home for mixing photo-chemicals?

    http://www.waterdistiller.couk.com/
    yes you should use it for a stock solution , working solution gould be filtered water

    If you have walmart close by, they sell distilled water for about a dollar a gallon , and most of your stock solutions you mix a litter at a time , so unless you are doing it in huge volume , no need for anything more...
    Regards. ILYA

  2. #12
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    I don't think the cost of a dedicated distillation unit is justifiable.

    If the tap water is so bad that it is not useable for photographic applications, then it is probably also not drinkable, and you have a much larger problem to deal with.

    In our former home, we had a very damp basement and had to run a dehumidifier continuously during warm weather. I viewed the dehumidifier as a poor-man's distillation unit and used filtered water from it to rinse negatives. All other chemical processes used ordinary tap water. Since our town water supply was pretty hard, we had a water softener.

    When we built our new home a few years ago, we made a decision to again have a water softener and to add a reverse osmosis drinking water filtration system. I use softened tap water for the vast majority of photographic applications, but I do use water from the RO system to dilute PhotoFlo for the final rinse step with negatives. The basement is dry so we don't have a dehumidifier.

    I keep a jug of distilled water for use in mixing chemicals for alternative processes (Pt/Pd, etc), but the total volume of that water that I use during the course of a year is so small that its far cheaper to just buy a gallon at the supermarket.
    Louie

  3. #13
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    I installed a RO system for the darkroom. It is a Kinetico GX deluxe. The ppm meter tests the same as distilled water and that's 0 ppm. I use it for everything except when mixing metal salts and then I use distilled. I have city water that tests at about 200 ppm so the water is pretty good to start with. The reason I use distilled for the metal salts is I've heard that even with a RO system it can leave minute amounts of chlorine in the water. I have a faucet mounted right to the darkroom sink and it saves a lot of time, money, and energy from lugging jugs of distilled. I shoot and print ULF so I go through a lot of water. It has a 20 gal holding tank and recovery is a gal/hr. I could probably use it just as well for mixing palladium but I haven't risked doing it considering the price of pd. But just a few hundred ml of distilled is not a lot to keep on hand.

  4. #14
    RobertP's Avatar
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    When buying distilled water you will want to make sure you read the label. Some are RO distilled instead of heat distilled.

  5. #15

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    I only use distilled water for final rinse of film and stock colour solutions that get kept. Anything one shot I don't bother.

  6. #16

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    Hello !
    When I was young I was told to do B&W lab work at a camera club.
    The old timer's prepared the D76 stock solution for us rockies to use. They had a big kettle into which they boiled municipal water in order to remove calcium salts by deposition, and coagulate all the living parts the water has gathered in all the pipes from the plant to the club tap. This way, the stock solution keep for month and nothing was wasted.
    On the other hand, the WHO specifies what is a drinkable water. IMHO, if it is fine to be drunk by a baby, it will be fine for the chemicals.....So save our planet, conserve energy as much as you can !
    Today I only boil water for the 5 liters pack of Xtol for wich I need more than a year storage life. All other stuff is mixed with my plain tap municipal water.
    Hope this helps

  7. #17
    RobertP's Avatar
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    You can also run multiple faucets from the Kinetico. I have one upstairs on the kitchen sink for drinking water and another line run to the ice maker. I also installed a small sink in the garage with another faucet for mixing wet plate chemicals such as potassium cyanide. These are chemicals I want to use separate from the living quarters just as a safety precaution. This is convenient as I have an explosion proof fridge out there where I store collodion and ether also.

  8. #18
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    Water filtered through one of the units with carbon and resin do a fine job as long as you keep the cartridge fresh as indicated in the instructions.

    But if your water is not too hard, DW or filtered water are not needed. I have moderate water here and don't use DW to mix B&W or color, but I do have a plain particle filter.

    PE

  9. #19
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    Like Ron (PE) suggests I use a small domestic water filter system, this de-ionises and filters the water. This is perfectly sufficient and far more economic than using de-ionised water.

    Ian

  10. #20
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    There always seem to be an assumption with threads on "distilled water" that distilled water is pure. It isn't. Distilling won't remove many of the disolved materials since they get carried up with the steam.

    Deionised is usually better unless you have distilled water which has been distilled several times which makes it expensive.

    go here and fit one of these to your inlet system and have high quality water on tap at any time.

    They are cheap and easy to fit and will give you consistent water quality which is plenty good enough for photographic work.

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