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  1. #21

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    Contact your local water supplier for a "Mineral and Flaura Quality Report". Iron in the water is the bad guy for photo chemistry.

  2. #22
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    Our local hardware supplier has those, which are similar to the ones Ian and I are talking about. They are just larger than the spigot or decanter sized systems.

    I bought an el cheapo system and buy the plain filter cartridges to remove the particulate matter, but the heavy duty carbon+resin filters will supply you with DI water.

    Distilled water can carry the chlorine and volatile organics over during distillation, and they are sometimes contaminated with Iron or its salts from a corroding distiller. This happens with poor maintenance.

    PE

  3. #23
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    I've been using tap water for most of my work but I have used filtered water. When I compared my results for my negatives and prints, there was no discernible difference to my eye.
    "The secret to life is to keep your mind full and your bowels empty. Unfortunately, the converse is true for most people."

  4. #24
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    the problem with tap water is that it may or may not be consistent in quality from day to day or month to month. Generally its fine but if you are mixing developer stock I would use water of known quality and always use filtered water for final rinse of negatives to negate the possibilty of drying marks caused by sediments.
    One the deionising units as I gave the link to, whilst not stictly necessary for most people, it does remove the possiblity of inconsistent water supply quality which is certainly a concern for some people.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Our local hardware supplier has those, which are similar to the ones Ian and I are talking about. They are just larger than the spigot or decanter sized systems.

    I bought an el cheapo system and buy the plain filter cartridges to remove the particulate matter, but the heavy duty carbon+resin filters will supply you with DI water.

    Distilled water can carry the chlorine and volatile organics over during distillation, and they are sometimes contaminated with Iron or its salts from a corroding distiller. This happens with poor maintenance.

    PE
    PE,
    What levels are considered too hard for mixing chemicals ? Our local water has a ph of 8.2, and a calcium content of 145 mg/l. I was planning on just using a Brita filter. However, I do have an RO unit left over from my aquarium hobby but hate to use it as it has a 3 to 1 rejection rate.
    gphoto120

  6. #26
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    The pH is in the normal range, but I'm not sure of calcium levels.

    Kodak developers contain enough sequestrant for average hard water, that is all I can add.

    Sorry.

    PE

  7. #27
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    Percepts makes point about distilled water, and Ron (PE) makes similar comments.

    The only distilled water you can truly trust is de-ionised prior to distillation.

    However in practice in this day and age de-ionised water is all you need for photographic purposes.

    Ian

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tapscott. View Post
    Would it be worthwhile making distilled water at home for mixing photo-chemicals?

    http://www.waterdistiller.couk.com/
    and finally, the web literature for the unit you have given a link to is a pack of lies about distilled water. And the unit costs 3 times that of a deioniser plus running costs which are high. Yes you need to replace the resin blocks in a deioniser but if your water quality is already quite good, then running costs will be low. And since you are in Plymouth, then I guess your water comes from Burrator or at least from Dartmoor which means it will be soft (acidic) and of good quality just like mine. ( I live in Kingsbridge).

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by percepts View Post
    and finally, the web literature for the unit you have given a link to is a pack of lies about distilled water. And the unit costs 3 times that of a deioniser plus running costs which are high. Yes you need to replace the resin blocks in a deioniser but if your water quality is already quite good, then running costs will be low. And since you are in Plymouth, then I guess your water comes from Burrator or at least from Dartmoor which means it will be soft (acidic) and of good quality just like mine. ( I live in Kingsbridge).
    Glad to know that. Anyway, what does a deioniser look like?
    Cheers.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tapscott. View Post
    Would it be worthwhile making distilled water at home for mixing photo-chemicals?

    http://www.waterdistiller.couk.com/
    Use EDTA if you have calcium sludge or problems with Ca++ or Mg++.
    Or use RO water.

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