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  1. #31
    percepts's Avatar
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  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    The only distilled water you can truly
    trust is de-ionised prior to distillation.

    However in practice in this day and
    age de-ionised water is all you need for
    photographic purposes. Ian
    De-ionization deals only with contaminants of an
    ionic nature and yields ionic free water. The usual water
    softening by ion-exchange yields soft water with lots of ions.
    Reverse Osmosis types can reduce considerably both ionic and
    non-ionic contaminants. Distilled water is essentially de-ionised
    de-mineralized water.

    As for ultra-pure, fractional distillation, and ???. As for myself
    and very hard water a small capacity RO unit may do. They
    cost little but do need to be plumbed in. Dan

  3. #33

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    For years I had bottled distilled water delivered and finally got sick of the cost, went to hardware and got two filter cans and put them inline with the smallest micron filters I could find, change them once a year and I've never looked back and couldn't be happier. Use PFlow as per directions, hang my negs from a wire I have running the length of my darkroom, and never need to clean them.

  4. #34
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    To get water that is free of ions and organics, a mixed bed resin is often used. It combines and anionic resin, a cationic resin and an organic adsorbant such as charcoal or one of the more powerful resins for organics.

    Many household fiters will do both.

    PE

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