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  1. #11

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    May 2003
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    Valley Stream, NY
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    I've been using XTOL for about 10 years now myself and have never had a problem with the stuff that couldn't be traced to my own error. I would not worry at all about using it. I think you'll find it an excellent general purpose developer for just about any film out there. I don't use enough film to justify reusing stock or running a replenished system, so I simply dilute the stock anywhere from 1+1 to 1+3 and use it as a 1 shot developer.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Willamette Valley, Oregon
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    Quote Originally Posted by j-fr View Post
    You can use a small piece of enlarging paper as a test strip.
    lj-fr www.j-fr.dk
    An issue of Camera & Darkroom describes that test.
    Emergence time is something to note as it is an indicator
    of the developer's activity. Test when fresh then as the
    developer is used. Hold paper and exposure constant as
    both are factors affecting emergence time. Dan

  3. #13

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    Jan 2005
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    I wouldn't attach too much meaning to the "emerging time" as it is a rather inaccurate measure of developer activity. It is still a useful practical test for dead developer. The best is to use a piece of film or bromide paper, rather than most other papers. If you want to measure the emergence time, use same film, same exposure (or same room light), same agitation and temperature, of course. Chloride and chlorobromide emulsions develop much faster and they are also more susceptible to the solvent effect of the film developer, which is adjusted for iodobromide emulsions typical of camera negative films.

    Personally, when I do testing of developer formulas and keeping properties, I measure the electrochemical reduction potential at a platinum electrode. (It looks kinda similar to a pH electrode but it has a platinum electrode tip instead of a glass bulb, and it measures millivolts rather than pH.) Otherwise, I put a bit of developer and a film strip in a flask and vigorously stir it on a magnetic stirrer, to shorten the test time before seeing darkening film.
    Last edited by Ryuji; 04-27-2007 at 07:05 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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