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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    I did not indicate any 70mm Efke film, as Maco as one of their major customers doe not list it. But googeling a bit, it seems that at least it was around.
    Thus this will make roughly 4 tyes of B&W emulsions on 70mm base. Two of them unperforated.

    There is a perforated 70mm film! That is the ROLLEI INFRARED, article No. +RI1008, price approx. 132.00 USD, for the roll of 70mm x 30.5 meters. Order can be made by FREESTYLE, or directly with MACO in Germany. This is also an absolutely normal B&W film, only with a far red sensitation. Without filter, thus, a very highly soluble B&W film, with special IR Filters a genuine IR film. Presently, are 200 pieces of films at Hamburg/Germany in the department store. The price is therefore so attractive, because this film is used also as an aerial film.

    More information to the ROLLEI IR film with dr5, Freestyle, or under www.mahn.net

  2. #22
    AgX
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    I already referred to that very film some posts above.

  3. #23
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    If you really dig - on google - and ask around, you can usually find 70mm stock of pretty much whatever emulsion you want.

    I've been able to purloin fresh tech pan, plus-x, HP5 and color IR in 70mm in the last year or two.

    Now all I need is a 6x12 back that'll run 70mm!!

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFCARTER View Post
    IMAX is actually shot on 65mm negative film, perforated. The IMAX prints are on 70mm film. So this option won't work for you.
    I find that odd. I thought it was 70mm (70mm isn't REALLY 70mm, you know!-it's much more like 65) but what i find odd about your statement is that IMAX uses a perf film. I know that the bulk of the struggle in developing IMAX technology was in not using a claw mechanism - but instead they developed a patented 'rolling loop' system.

    http://www.in70mm.com/newsletter/199.../projector.htm
    http://www.film.wz.cz/imax.htm
    http://www.proiezionisti.com/pagine/tecnica_imax.php

    Maybe the cameras are different?

  5. #25

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    70mm perforated film

    Hi,

    There is the nice b&w Rollei 400 Infrared negative film, sold by MACO Germany. It is possible to have these films developed by Studio13 in Germany in the Agfa Scala process. The result is a series of excellent b&w diapositives. So you can still use the big 70mm Magazines for Hasselblad and so on.

    Gerhard Boogaard
    Netherlands

  6. #26
    AgX
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    Welkom Gerhard!

    I thought the Scala process was too hot for any other film.

  7. #27

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    Sparky,

    Yes Imax is shot on 65mm. Then printed onto 70mm.

    See the following under the Imax description.
    http://www.cinematographers.nl/FORMATS1.htm

    Yes the 65mm film used in Imax cameras is perforated.


    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky View Post
    I find that odd. I thought it was 70mm (70mm isn't REALLY 70mm, you know!-it's much more like 65) but what i find odd about your statement is that IMAX uses a perf film. I know that the bulk of the struggle in developing IMAX technology was in not using a claw mechanism - but instead they developed a patented 'rolling loop' system.

    http://www.in70mm.com/newsletter/199.../projector.htm
    http://www.film.wz.cz/imax.htm
    http://www.proiezionisti.com/pagine/tecnica_imax.php

    Maybe the cameras are different?

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky View Post
    I find that odd. I thought it was 70mm (70mm isn't REALLY 70mm, you know!-it's much more like 65) but what i find odd about your statement is that IMAX uses a perf film. I know that the bulk of the struggle in developing IMAX technology was in not using a claw mechanism - but instead they developed a patented 'rolling loop' system.

    http://www.in70mm.com/newsletter/199.../projector.htm
    http://www.film.wz.cz/imax.htm
    http://www.proiezionisti.com/pagine/tecnica_imax.php

    Maybe the cameras are different?
    IMAX camera film is perforated, as well as the print that is projected. While it is true that the projector uses a "rolling loop" for the frame-by-frame pull down at the projection aperture, there still needs to be a way to register the film, as well as a way to pull the film through the rest of the mechanism, and peforations are essential for this.

    It is my understanding in regards 70mm cine film, that the ONLY difference in size between the camera stock and the release prints is that originally, the release prints were 5mm wider (to make 70mm) on the OUTSIDE of the perforations to allow for the magnetic sound tracks applied to the film stock on the outside edges of the film, outside the perforations. Thus the perforations were identical between camera stock and release print.
    Of course IMAX does not use sound tracks applied to the film, rather the sound tracks are on a separate film run in sync with the picture.

  9. #29
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    so - they use an adjacent band on the film stock for the SMPTE timecode or something...? I guess it could be googled. I think the cameras MUST use the same rolling loop system, though. I remember seeing an excellent documentary on the technical development of imax. Fascinating. All of the traditonal 'claw' mechanisms they tried to develop resulted in the film SHATTERING into hundreds of tiny pieces... the archimedes principle in motion, man.

  10. #30
    AgX
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    Why would a traditional claw not work on the IMAX camera? I thought such worked too on 60f/sec 35mm cameras. And what about Showscan?

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