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  1. #21

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    I believe the Rollei 100 is leftover APX 100; plenty around in 35mm. I always assumed that Maco made nothing, just bought from others and put it in their own box.

  2. #22

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    More clear information about the Rollei Retro films is not available, from the marketing manager himself in a German forum, same question. Rollei/Maco has two film production locations: Filmotec (Wolfen, Germany) and Gevaert (Mortsel, Belgium).

    Guten Tag, mein Name ist Sebastian Junghans, ich bin im Marketing bei Rollei/Maco tätig und möchte gerne versuchen, auf Ihre Fragen zu antworten.

    1. Stimmt es eigentlich....
    Ja, es stimmt, die unter der Marke ROLLEI RETRO konfektionierten Filme, KB wie RF stammen aus der letzten Grossproduktion der Agfa im Jahr 2005.

    2. Violett.
    Bei dem, was Ihnen aufgefallen ist, handelt es sich um nicht gänzlich aufgelösten Sensibilisierungsfarbstoff. Wenn ein frisches, gutes Fixierbad verwendet wurde und ausreichend gewässert, dann kann trotzdem eine rötliche Einfärbung, die durchaus auch bei Filmen anderer Hersteller nicht unbekannt ist, vorliegen. Dies ist fotochemisch kein Nachteil. Diese Einfärbung verschwindet unter Einfluss von Tageslicht, bzw. UV-Licht rückstandsfrei.

    3. Rollen / Curlingverhalten
    Die unter Rollei Retro angebotenen Filme wurden ursprünglich nicht für den Einsatz als Rollfilm vorgesehen, sondern als KB-Filme. Daher ist der grau gefärbte Triacetatfilmträger etwas dicker als sonst von Agfa APX-Rollfilmen gewohnt. Standard war: 100 Mikron bei RF, 135 Mikron bei KB. Das mag einen Einfluss auch auf das Planlage-Verhalten der Filme haben.

    4. Planlage
    Auf das Planlage-Verhalten haben jedoch auch Parameter, wie die Wässerung und die Trocknung einen wichtigen Einfluss. Mit der Verwendung von spezielllen Filmentwicklern hat das erfahrungsgemäss nichts zu tun.

    5. Entscheidung zur Produktion von APX-Rollfilmen
    In der Abwägung keine APX Rollfilme mehr anbieten zu können oder eine vielleicht nicht ganz optimale Planlage zu akzeptieren, hatte sich Rollei/Maco dazu entschlossen, eine sehr erhebliche Menge APX Filme mit 135 Mikron durch die Fotokemika in Zagreb abpacken zu lassen.

    6. Entwicklungszeiten:
    Die "alten" APX-Emulsionen verlangten kürzere Entwicklungszeiten als die "NEW"-Version die noch im Jahr 2005 durch die Agfa eingeführt wurde. Die Belichtungstoleranzen von "NEW" sind erheblich weiter als bei der älteren Version. Dem hat bisher die A&O mit der neuen Rodinal-Zeitentabelle entsprochen. Hier sind deutliche Differenzen zu erkennen. Bei der Version "NEW" handelt es sich zweifelsfrei um die erheblich verbesserte Version. Die Zeiten für die "NEW"-Version haben bisher noch keinen Eingang in die Entwicklungszeit-Tabellen der Tetenal gefunden.

    Mit freundlichem Gruss / With kind regards

    Sebastian Junghans
    Marketing Manager
    MACO PHOTO PRODUCTS
    Hans O. Mahn & Co KG
    Brookstieg 4
    22145 Hamburg-Stapelfeld
    Telefon: +49 (0) 40 23 70 08-73
    Telefax: +49 (0) 40 23 70 08-488
    E-Mail: junghans@mahn.net
    Web: http://www.mahn.net + http://www.rolleifilm.com (USA)
    Handelsregister Lübeck HRA 2205
    Umsatzsteuer-ID-Nummer DE118812398
    Maco Photo Products ist Mitglied im Photoindustrie Verband e.V.
    http://www.photoindustrie-verband.de

  3. #23
    Mark Antony's Avatar
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    Thanks for that
    My German is not good but does the text posted mean that 35mm Rollei is the last batch of APX made at Leverkusen? and that 120 rolls are KB emulsions made in Zagreb by EFKE/Adox?

    I ask this because I'd like to get my hands on some 120 APX especially the 400 as I have never tried that film.
    APX 100 is probably my favourite film, but I've not used any 120 since the 80's!

    Possibly I'll e-mail the guy in the link or just enjoy the 35mm stuff and look to Foma for 120

  4. #24

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    Correct, all Retro films are made of the same 135 micron film material from the APX 100/400 master rolls and the 120 roll film versions were assembled by Efke, Croatia. The 35mm versions are done in Bergheim, Germany. Here all 35mm materials from Rollei/Maco comming from Filmotec and Gevaert are manufactured.
    Explained is that the 135 micron material is slightly less flat than the original 100 micron material which was former used by Agfa for the 120 roll film versions on tri-acetate base.

    For future assembly of 120 roll films in Europe, the choices are limited for Ilford, Foma or Efke. But you can indentify them all easily on their used backing paper

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Antony View Post

    I ask this because I'd like to get my hands on some 120 APX especially the 400 as I have never tried that film.
    APX 100 is probably my favourite film, but I've not used any 120 since the 80's!

    Don't kill yourself trying to find/shoot APX 400 in 120. It's getting scarce and expensive. I shot quite a bit of it when it was out and it's good, but not any better than Tri-X, HP-5, or Neopan 400. The price was quite good tho'! I miss APX 400, but I miss it the least of the discontinued films. Just my $.02.

  6. #26

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    APX + RODINAL

    Quote Originally Posted by Snapshot View Post
    Hi All,

    I've been experimenting with APX 100 and Rodinal. This combination seems to work well together as I generally like how APX turns out. However, I'm thinking the recommended Agfa development time is a little too long. The negatives seem overdeveloped and there's significant grain (which isn't a surprise). Although I'm expecting some grain, I believe the grain can be a little less pronounced than the results I'm seeing.

    I'm using a 1:50 dilution ratio and developing for 17 minutes at EI 100. Initial agitation is for 30 seconds and 5 seconds every half minute. Can anyone give me their preferred Rodinal dilution and development technique, especially if it involves APX 100. Thanks in advance!


    Why don't you download the new RODINAL pdf under: www.mahn.net

    Cheers

  7. #27
    Rolleijoe's Avatar
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    If you're missing the Agfa papers, try Fotokemika Varycon fiber from Freestyle. Since Agfa went bellyup, it's the next best thing. Beautiful tones, and I'm shooting their Efke 25 and Efke 100 as replacement films. These will give you those really great 1930s Agfa tones, especially when printed on their paper.

    For processing I'm using Rodinal 1:50 20min @20gradC. Works every time.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Antony View Post
    I miss the Agfa papers especially Record Rapid.



    I tried to give the Record rapid colour and 'glow' not sure how it will look on your monitors.
    I test some films on my blog
    http://photo-utopia.blogspot.com/

  8. #28

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    [QUOTE][Don't kill yourself trying to find/shoot APX 400 in 120. It's getting scarce and expensive/QUOTE]

    That depends on the area you're located. Rollei Retro 100/400 films in Europe have about the same prices as the Fomapan 100/400 films which are marketet for a very low price in the USA.
    But also in the past the APX 100/400 prices in the USA were extremely low compared to Europe.

  9. #29
    Gary Holliday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fotohuis View Post
    Correct, all Retro films are made of the same 135 micron film material from the APX 100/400 master rolls and the 120 roll film versions were assembled by Efke, Croatia.
    So if this is the case, has anyone reported quality control problems with Rollei Retro 100?

  10. #30
    JPD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Holliday View Post
    So if this is the case, has anyone reported quality control problems with Rollei Retro 100?
    This is an old thread, but anyway: Rollei Retro 100 is APX 100. The 120-film uses the same film base as 135-film, and are therefore thicker than standard 120-film.

    The 120-films are PACKED in Croatia. Not coated there.

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