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  1. #31
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    I wasn't even considering cyanide. I was thinking about all the healthy things there might be in sea salt, for example, that might retard development or worse. You don't usually want iodine in developer, nor some other things that are just fine for human consumption. After all, our bodies contain at least traces of nearly, if not all the natural elements, and by now maybe even some of the unnatural ones. I would not hesitate to eat Kosher salt any more than I hesitated to eat those delicious Kosher dill pickles a while ago.

    Truth be told, I did some experiments a while back testing the use of salt in developers and decided it was not worth the trouble. These were reported in the article "Salt to Taste" in Photo Techniques. That was when I found that 4 grams of sodium ascorbate did more good in a liter of working Rodinal than either salt or sulfite. You might find the same to be true of D-23.
    Gadget Gainer

  2. #32
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    I forgot to say that if you do not use pure sodium chloride you won't be able to report the results so that we can share. I don't even think I can get Kosher salt in my part of West Virginia. I could get road salt, but I KNOW I will not use that!
    Gadget Gainer

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    According to Anchell, Borax has a ph of 9.5, while sulfite has a ph of 8.0.
    According to Grant Haist (Modern Photographic Processing, Vol. 1, pages 244, 245); Borax has low solubility in water, only 0.3% is said to be hydrolyzed in a solution containing 0.1 mol wt in 1 liiter of water, resulting in a pH of 9.2, a much lower value than either the carbonates or hydroxides, and this limits its usefulness to low pH developers.

    On page 246, Haist discusses Sulfite Alkalis. Sodium Sulfite is a weakly alkaline salt that is capable of acting as the sole alkali for developing agents with amino groups, as for example, Metol or Amidol. Sodium Sulfiite is an alkali because it hydrolizes in solution to produce sodium hydroxide.

    The Microdol -X substitute recipe I posted earlier in this thread can be found on page 379 of Haist, and is attributed by Haist to Edgar Hyman.
    Last edited by Tom Hoskinson; 06-01-2007 at 12:53 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: cant spell
    Tom Hoskinson
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  4. #34

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    Well, that certainly is beyond me! I didn't do so well in H.S. chemistry, but I have no doubt that what you have said is accurate.

  5. #35
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    The fact that the solubility of borax is greater than its ionization whatchacallit is why it is a good buffer, tending to keep pH constant over small additions of other acids or bases. It's too complicated for me to explain even if I knew how, but you can dissolve a little borax or saturate the solution with it and still not get pH much different from 9.2 because only a small part of the borax is ionized anyway and it's the degree of this ionization or separation into positive and negative pieces that is described by pH.
    Gadget Gainer

  6. #36
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    Speaking of explanations, one of our chemistry professors at WVU when I was there was describing destructive distillation of wood. He said "What comes out of the still is pyroligneous liquor, but I'll give you credit on the exam if you call it 'goo that comes off of burnt wood' ." I doubt anyone in that class ever forgot the term "Pyroligneous liquor."
    Gadget Gainer

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