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  1. #11

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    I use regular old Kodak fixer. I don't care about the stain. I just want it developed. Can't tell any difference anyway.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by glennfromwy View Post
    I use regular old Kodak fixer. I don't care about the stain. I just want it developed. Can't tell any difference anyway.
    If you don't care about the image stain, why not use D-76, D-23, Xtol, HC110, Rodinal etc., etc. instead of PMK?

    I'd still use a rapid fixer containing ammonium ion (TF-4, etc., or home brew).
    Tom Hoskinson
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  3. #13
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    Has anyone noticed that fixing PMK-stained negatives takes longer than negs developed in conventional developers?

    I had some brand new fresh fixer the other day, and I fogged a couple negatives that still hadn't cleared after 3 minutes in the fixer. I now give them a full 5 minutes of fixing (with constant agitation) before turning on the lights. That's never been the case for me with negs developed in xtol.
    Paul

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrPablo View Post
    Has anyone noticed that fixing PMK-stained negatives takes longer than negs developed in conventional developers?

    I had some brand new fresh fixer the other day, and I fogged a couple negatives that still hadn't cleared after 3 minutes in the fixer. I now give them a full 5 minutes of fixing (with constant agitation) before turning on the lights. That's never been the case for me with negs developed in xtol.
    Each film has its own fixing time in a particular fixing bath.

    Ideally, fixer should be tested before each use, with a test piece of the film you are using.

    Start by determining the film's Clearing Time in the fixer you will use.

    With the room lights on in your darkroom place a piece of the film (like the leader of a 35mm film) in fresh fixer. Record the temperature of the fixer. With gentle agitation, observe and record how long it takes the film to become completely transparent (i.e., clear). This is the Clearing Time. Multiply the Clearing Time by 3 to obtain the Total Fixing Time required.

    The Clearing Time and required fixing time will increase with each use of the fixer.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  5. #15
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    The films I'm using, FP4+ and HP5+, clear faster when developed in xtol than PMK, so the only variable that's different is the PMK.
    Paul

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrPablo View Post
    Has anyone noticed that fixing PMK-stained negatives takes longer than negs developed in conventional developers?

    I had some brand new fresh fixer the other day, and I fogged a couple negatives that still hadn't cleared after 3 minutes in the fixer. I now give them a full 5 minutes of fixing (with constant agitation) before turning on the lights. That's never been the case for me with negs developed in xtol.
    Paul, I posted a longer answer earlier.

    I don't use PMK, but I do use several other staining and tanning developers.

    The Pyrocat series of developers produce very low levels of fog and (for me, no measurable general stain - only image stain). My statement is based on my post development and fixing densitometry. I include a Stouffer step wedge in one of my negs as a control.

    Your PMK negatives may have had general stain that you interpreted as fog.

    XTol is a non-staining developer.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  7. #17
    nze
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    Just use Hypam and see no loss
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  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrPablo View Post
    The films I'm using, FP4+ and HP5+, clear faster when developed in xtol than PMK, so the only variable that's different is the PMK.

    How fast do undeveloped FP4+ and HP5+ Clear in fresh fixer of the type you are using?
    Tom Hoskinson
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  9. #19

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    Just about any fixer will do the job. Some people advise that highly acid fixers could interfere with the pyro stain. I haven't seen this, but keeping the pH near neutral seems to have some advantages in fixing and washing. Some also say that the alum hardener in some fixer interferes with pyro stain. Modern films do not usually need a hardening fixer, but some old style films (like Adox and some exotic emulsions) can benefit from hardening. I don't use PMK, but my usual routine is to fix in F-34 (non-hardening rapid fixer with a pH of 6.5), wash, and then treat the film with a solution like the old C-22 stabilizer (formaldehyde and PhotoFlo in a dilute solution with water) before drying. E-6 stabilizer will probably work as well.

    I wouldn't worry too much about the choice of fixer. Use whatever is on hand. Later, you may want to do some experiments to see if a less acid or non-hardening fixer improves the stain with your situation and technique.

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