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  1. #1

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    Fixer with PMK developer

    What kind of fixer can I use with PMK developer?
    Thank You

  2. #2
    Andrew O'Neill's Avatar
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    When I was using PMK I fixed my negatives in Ilford non-hardening rapid fix. Some claim that an alkaline fix is better. I tried it and couldn't see any difference. I've also used Ilford's rapid fix on rollo-pyro and pyrocat-HD with no problems.

  3. #3
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    I use an alkaline fixer, at first because it was supposedly better to use in terms of preserving image stain, but now I continue primarily because alkaline-processed negatives require a much shorter wash period than acid-fixed negatives.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  4. #4
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    I use regular Kodak fixer.

    The one thing is that I usually return my negatives to the PMK for a few minutes after they're fully fixed, so that they'll accumulate more stain on the silver. But I return them to a water stop bath first to make sure I'm not changing the pH of the PMK too much.
    Paul

  5. #5
    highpeak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJim View Post
    I use an alkaline fixer, at first because it was supposedly better to use in terms of preserving image stain, but now I continue primarily because alkaline-processed negatives require a much shorter wash period than acid-fixed negatives.
    other than that, I found it made my film (35mm) really flat! The short washing time is definitely a plus, another thing is it's smells not as bad as the acid fixer.

    Alex W.

  6. #6
    Aurelien's Avatar
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    Best fixer with PMK is TF4 from photographer's formulary or Berfix from bergger. It's an alcaline fixer.
    Aurelien, Analog Photographer

    the analog place to be

  7. #7
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    Dr. P, at a workshop with Gordon Hutchings I was told by him that the pyro "after bath" was no longer being used by him. One result of this soak is the addition of "general stain" which can actually affect the negative in a bad way. It shows up most obviously in the shadow values and will make shadow textures look muddy or somewhat soft with respect to contrast. I use PMK for portraits, as it does a very nice job on skin tones and shadow values aren't as important for the look I want. General stain is not the way to go in some settings.

    For landscapes I use pyrocat-hd because shadow values are so much nicer. tim

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Albin View Post
    What kind of fixer can I use with PMK developer? Thank You
    Sodium thiosulfate straight will do. I use it for film. For
    paper I'll likely carbonate or bicarbonate it as tests so far
    indicate more rapid and complete fixing. I don't use staining
    developers but have seen sodium thiosulfate recommended
    for the purpose. The ph is near neutral.

    Spoon up fresh fix at processing time. As a 120 roll starting
    point try 16 grams, a half ounce plus, of the anhydrous and
    ten minutes with more or less continuous agitation. Dan

  9. #9
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albin View Post
    What kind of fixer can I use with PMK developer?
    Thank You
    Rapid fixer will work fine, as well as sodium thiosulphate or an alkaline fixer. Just pick your poison.
    Don Bryant

  10. #10
    DrPablo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noseoil View Post
    Dr. P, at a workshop with Gordon Hutchings I was told by him that the pyro "after bath" was no longer being used by him. One result of this soak is the addition of "general stain" which can actually affect the negative in a bad way. It shows up most obviously in the shadow values and will make shadow textures look muddy or somewhat soft with respect to contrast. I use PMK for portraits, as it does a very nice job on skin tones and shadow values aren't as important for the look I want. General stain is not the way to go in some settings.

    For landscapes I use pyrocat-hd because shadow values are so much nicer. tim
    Good to know, thanks Tim. It'll certainly make things simpler and quicker to skip the after bath. I'm happy with PMK, and I really like its compensating effect on highlights -- it'll be a while before I need a refill, but I'll think about pyrocat-hd when the time comes.
    Paul

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