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  1. #11

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    Oct 2006
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    Van Buren, Arkansas
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    Most, if not all Litho film is as thin as roll film. The process cameras normally used to expose this film to make negatives for burning printing plates universally have a vacuum back for holding the film flat. These cameras are usually built into a wall between the darkroom and the room where the artwork is put behind glass on an easel for exposure. One loads the film under a red safelight in the darkroom on the vacuum back which swings open from the camera like a door on a refrigerator. There are no guides to slide the film under, rather there are marks on the flat back to position the film, the vacuum holds it flat.

  2. #12

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    Aug 2005
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    Los Alamos, NM
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    My experience with litho film is limited to Kodak Kodalith III and to the various offerings Freestyle has sold over the years. I have shot it in the camera and I have printed it. Regardless of the processing, it tends toward very high contrast. It is quite possible to get a usable continuous tone negative from these films if you use one of the "document film" developers that are designed to give low contrast with microfilm. Even then, the contrast is much higher than for normal films. This may be useful for alternative processes. When printing, my experience is a bit different from one of the other posters. In Dektol, these films are very contrasty, and they tend toward lithographic black or white with full development. You can a range of continuous tones if you are careful, but the contrast tends to be at the high end of paper contrasts, in my experience. If you dilute the developer or use a low contrast developer, it is easier to get a continuous tone print. The current products from Freestyle seem to be a bit less contrasty than the older Kodak material.

  3. #13

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    Dec 2002
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    I have used this material in masking negatives. It is capable of making a continuous tone negative. I used Dektol diluted 1-10 or 1-30 depending on the mask I wanted to make.

    Jim Galli has used it as an in camera film, from what I understand, and has devised a developer formulation for that film...I think that it exists somewhere on this site.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  4. #14

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    Jan 2006
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    Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
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    Try Rodinal at 1:150. You can develop by inspection with the RED safelight on. I shoot Kodak and Freestyle lith film in my Century and Speed Graphics with good results. I shoot it at iso 5.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

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