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  1. #11

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    Excellent Idea, Dan! I like to save on my chemical $$$.
    Russell

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Moxom View Post
    As I am also a user of Ilford Hypam as it is a non hardening fixer. Is the Arista/Clayton non hardening aswell?
    Clayton is non hardening as well, which is why when I am printing with Salvich single weight paper I use standard fix.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by w35773 View Post
    Excellent Idea, Dan! I like to save on my chemical $$$.
    That 6ml you've mentioned should be about right. On an
    8x10 or a roll of 120 basis that is 24ml. A test for minimum
    may be 4ml. More time is required as less fix is used because
    the fixer is nearer exhaustion towards the end of it's use.

    Arbitrarily I set 10 minutes with intermittent inversion agitation
    as the time in which complete fixation must take place. Some
    take that much time using rapid fix. You'd need to balance
    time and great chemical milage.

    Thrifty use and time considerations aside there is the
    assuredness of using fresh chemistry each use and the
    convenience of tossing the used fix down the drain. Dan

  4. #14

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    Feb 2008
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    Opened Shlef Life

    Quote Originally Posted by Lowell Huff View Post
    Yes, Clayton Chemical makes the Arista Odorless Fixer. Yes, it is truely odorless. Yes, while we guarrantee our products for a minimum two years of shelf life. Yes, all fixers and developers will eventually "go bad." We will replace any product that does not meet your perceived performance or product value. Capacity of any product is dependant on the dilution and application. Please feel free to contact me about any technical information or help you need.

    I have had a bottle of undiluted oderless fixer (Arista) opened for a little over a month. I opened it yesterday to make a new batch and it smelled a bit like rotten eggs. It had a bit of white particulate material floating around in it as well. I used it and it seemed to be working, but now I am having second thoughts and think maybe I should refix the prints. Has the unconcentrted fixer gone bad?

    Paul

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by pmongillo View Post
    I have had a bottle of undiluted oderless fixer (Arista) opened for a little over a month. I opened it yesterday to make a new batch and it smelled a bit like rotten eggs. It had a bit of white particulate material floating around in it as well. I used it and it seemed to be working, but now I am having second thoughts and think maybe I should refix the prints. Has the unconcentrted fixer gone bad?
    The symptoms you describe (rotten-egg odor and floating particulate matter) are certainly the symptoms of bad fixer. I can't say with certainty that anything you've fixed in that fixer is improperly fixed, but if you intend the prints to last, re-fixing in fresh fixer would be the safest course of action.

  6. #16

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    I'm sorry to revive an old thread, but I have been using the Arista Odorless Liquid fixer for my last dozen rolls or so, and complete clearing takes a lot longer than the 1-2 min as the instructions on the bottle suggests (mine take 10-15min for a fresh batch). The instructions say a dilution of 1:9 for both film and paper, but if this fixer is indeed the same as the Clayton then 1:4 would be necessary. Does anyone have experience or a suggestion as to a dilution to make for a shorter fixing time? Normally I would just go back to illford or Kodak fixer, but I prefer the odorless.

  7. #17

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    I agree with koko. I only use this stuff for prints as film was just taking too long for my patience... . I have had it "crash" with precipitate. It did continue to work with the film I was using but the particulate stuck to the film emulsion and pretty much ruined it for anything else but scanning. It is cheap and seems to work fine, I have no evidence to suggest otherwise. For film I use PF Tf-4.film clears in no time and is long lasting. I have not done the math but I bet there is not much difference in mileage between them.

  8. #18

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    If its not just me, then I guess the Clayton is worth a try before going back to something else.

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