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  1. #1
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I have a Jobo processor that I used to run E-6. I've aways avoided rotary processing B&W because the developer works so proportionally actively on the highlight areas of the negative compared with intermittant agitation. However for 4x5 it's really my only option other than trays right now.
    Anyone have any tips? Are there any developers that are particularly suitable for rotary or should I just use my favorite dev. (FG7) and test for exposure and developing time? I usually shoot Tri-X.

    -Neal
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  2. #2

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    You should have no problems at all. I and many others are using Jobos or Unicolors for rotary processing with good results. My developer is D76 1:1. You already know that for constant agitation you need to shorten the "usual" developing time by 10 or 15 percent.

  3. #3

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    Steve,

    I don't know if you have ever used Pyro or if you're interested, but rollo pyro is VERY easy and gets great results in a Jobo.

    dgh

    David G Hall

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  5. #5
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    John,
    Thanks for that link. I found it very interesting. Especially the following quote:

    "I also found that contrary to conventional wisdom there were no significant differences in curve shape resulting from using continuous rotary agitation vs. intermittent agitation."

    -Neal
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  6. #6
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    David.

    You're right, I don't know if I want to get into Pyro right now but I'm curious.
    Do you happen to know if the Yellowish stain of the negative has any noticable affect when printing on blue sensitive silver papers? How about MG?

    -Neal
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  7. #7

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    Flotsam,

    From what I understand it adds contrast, although I do not print on these papers and don't know.

    Also, regarding your original post, one thing pyro does do pretty universally is help you in the highlights, even in rotary agitation. It's famous for very delicate separations in clouds, skies, etc.

    dgh

    David G Hall

  8. #8

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    While I can not speak to the issue of rotary processing. I can speak to the issue of pyro...more specifically ABC pyro and tray processing. Over the years, I have tried a variety of film developers and I can say that the negatives using ABC pyro are the finest tonal range of any that I have ever developed. I print on Seagull VC and with the ABC formula the yellowish green stain is not readily apparent unless the bisulfite gets a little age to it. In fact I think that general stain can actually deteriously affect overall contrast. My negatives print very nicely on the VC paper with excellent low through mid tone separation. It is however in the high values that pyro negatives shine, in my experience. I develop by inspection with general guidelines of times and film combinations. I felt some trepedition when I began using Pyro...but with precautions it is not difficult to use.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  9. #9
    lee
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    I had a Jobo CPP-2 for about a year. I could process lots of 35 and 2.25 film at once, but I don't shoot those formats very much. I could process 6 4x5's at a time. I was into PMK big time and I could never get my PMK to look like the tray developed film. Rollo Pyro is pretty different but seems to work ok with Jobo's. I never used it but have seen processed film from Rollo Pyro. I prefer to tray develop my largeformat film. I guess if one came along again at the price I paid for mine I would probably buy it. But just to have.

    lee\c

  10. #10
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I went the Bostick & Sullivan site to check out the information on rollo Pyro. Fascinating. Especially the tanning action that it has on the denser areas of the neg allowing the shadows to continue to develop proportionally. Sadly. I think that I have to wait to establish a more permanent and dedicated darkroom before exploring new [to me] processes. Thanks for pointing me to rollo anyway.

    This thread has shown once again that APUG members are both knowledgable _and_ helpful. Thanks to all.

    -Neal
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

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