Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,525   Posts: 1,572,356   Online: 990
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,502
    Images
    299
    Ole, have you noticed that when using an orange filter with Efke 25, you get a different tone in the sky all the same, rather than using a truly pan-chromatic emulsion? I know that the filter factor will be higher, but is that really the only difference? I would imagine that you could darken a blue sky significantly since you're blocking those wavelengths quite effectively, but I've never really looked for the effect.
    Thank you for correcting me, by the way. Ortho-pan-chromatic from now on...
    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,282
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Yes, the tones really are different, just as the tones are different between high-and low-red-sensitivity films and high- and low-blue-sensitivity films!

    All films are not created equal, and some (FP4+ for example) have a lowered sensitivity to blue compared to some other films. And there was Tech. Pan which had increased red sensitivity, and various surveillance, aerial and IR films with extended red sensitivity (into the IR range) and so on...

    Efke 25 with an orange filter will only see yellow and orange, so you get a pretty monochromatic look at things. With a panchromatic film you get red too, which makes quite a difference.

    Different filters do different things to different films, so trial and error is the only way I've found to learn what the result might be.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #13

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Tucson Az
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    226
    I would avoid Efke films. At one I was a big fan and then I began to notice very odd banding in the film. it is especially noticeable on smooth tonalities (skies, asphalt, grass, anywhere you have similar tones covering a majority of the image. Plus Efke 25 and 50 are orthochromatic, where pan F is pan chromatic. In other words Those two Efke films are not sensitive to reds. which means the excessive sensitivity to blue often leads to "bullet proof" skies, and other items that are blue. Red filters produce a horribly flat images, and require a filter factor of about 8 in order to get a printable neg. Efke films also scratch very easily. one good thing about efke is that it pushes very well. If you are going to use Efke i would recommend their 100 speed film, its pan chromatic.

    in 4x5 films I would have to recommend Bergger bfp200. This film is great, but expensive. I have that when coupled with ABC pyro it produce prints that really exceptional. This film dosen't push as well as Efke, but the over quality is much higher.

    Currently I shoot Ilford fp4 which is in the middle as far as price is concerned, and prints better then both Efke and Bergger. When it comes to pushing the film Ilford is wretched!!! It seems as though after fifteen minutes no more development occurs, and stain begins to increase very rapidly (with ABC Pyro).

    I found this out through experimentation with my personal "system." If I were you I would buy a box of all films your interested in and try them. You may find that all of us wrong and "Lucky" (the Chinese brand) is the best film for you. try 'em out and tell us what you think. Your opinion is by far the most important when it comes to your work.

    Yours:

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,879
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by JLP View Post
    Tom, how do you develop Delta 100 in Pyrocat? Believe we dev TMY identical so i imagine that your Delta 100 time would be close to what i need to.
    Thanks.


    jan
    Jan, I develop for 16 minutes at 72 degrees F 2:2:100 with semi stand agitation
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  5. #15
    noseoil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Tucson
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,898
    Images
    17

    Efke 25

    "In other words Those two Efke films are not sensitive to reds." Chris, not exactly sure where this statement comes from.

    Efke 25 is an ortho-panchromatic film (not very sensative to red), while Efke 100 is more of a straight panchromatic film.

    There have been issues with the Efke films, as you have mentioned, but I have found them to be reliable in their spectral response. There have been a few QC issues over the years, but I think you will find that Efke films have a pretty good following amoung the folks of apug. Since the original question was about Efke products in general, I think the original poster would be well served to at least try the 25 & 50 just to draw his own conclusions. tim

    P.S. Efke 25 / 35mm
    Last edited by noseoil; 09-16-2007 at 09:38 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Portugal
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    19
    Thanks all for help!

    I think I'll get a box of Efke 50 and also some Ilford FP4. I think that even if in the end I don't stick to Efke, pricewise it sounds like a good film for experimenting as I'm just starting with 4x5.

    I used to shoot FP4 in 35mm before changing to PanF, but never tried it in medium format as I don't like it as much as PanF. With PanF out of the equation it will probably be a safe bet and I guess the grain won't be an issue in 4x5...

    Regards,

    -Rui

  7. #17
    JLP
    JLP is offline
    JLP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Oregon
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,598
    Images
    19
    Thanks Tom, That's quite a potent dilution. Will have to make some testing since i need to use continuous agitation on my 5x7 negs. Do use minimal agitation for 4x5 though.


    jan

  8. #18
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,282
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by noseoil View Post
    "In other words Those two Efke films are not sensitive to reds." Chris, not exactly sure where this statement comes from.

    Efke 25 is an ortho-panchromatic film (not very sensative to red), while Efke 100 is more of a straight panchromatic film. ...

    I read "those two" to refer to EFKE 25 and 50, both of which are orthopanchromatic. EFKE 100 is, as you correctly stated, panchromatic.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  9. #19
    Flotsam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    S.E. New York State
    Posts
    3,221
    Images
    13
    I always like Efke/Adox 50 rollfilm in the studio. I like the tone and it has an unusually small reciprocity failure effect which makes it nice for those long exposures.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    North Yorkshire, England
    Posts
    292
    Rui,
    I have no experience of Efke 50 but when I compared Efke 100 with FP4 in 5 x 4 format, I found the FP4 to be significantly sharper- enough to notice the difference on a 10 x 8 inch print.

    Alan Clark

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin