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  1. #1
    naaldvoerder's Avatar
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    Temperature/ development adjustmetn for fiberpaper??

    This summer I can't seem to get my darkroom temperature below 24 degrees Celsius, so now the results obtained with my spligrade are off the mark. Does anybody know a temperature/development table as is included in the datasheets for Ilford film is usable for fiberbased paper?

    Thanks in advance

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    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I have problems with keeping my water temperature in my darkroom down in the summer - to help with it, I get a big bucket of ice and mix it with the water I'm planning to use for mixing my developer. With a bit of experimentation, you can blend the icewater and the regular water to get your temperatures down to 20-22.

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    The Agfa pdf files for paper development had times for 20, 25 and 30degC. I can email you a copy if you're interested. Different times for different developers, but typically:

    ______ 20deg_______25deg______30deg
    Fibre___90__________60________45sec

    Rc_____ 60_________45________30sec

    Sorry if the formatting isn't up to twenty-first century standards. I'm not with it! (but that's why my camera doesn't have a battery)

  4. #4
    naaldvoerder's Avatar
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    Thanks John, I would be interested. Can You send them to me?

    jaapjanhelder@planet.nl

    Thanks in advance

    JJ

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by naaldvoerder View Post
    This summer I can't seem to get my darkroom temperature
    below 24 degrees Celsius, so now the results obtained with
    my spligrade are off the mark.Thanks in advance
    Let me guess; contrast is up some. What developer are
    you using? If it contains hydroquinone and or glycin then
    you've a more temperature sensitive developer. At least
    hydroquinone is a high contrast component and when
    more active will up the contrast.

    I've read that glycin is a high ph metol. It is compounded
    as so. It also is reported to be usefully active at warmer
    temperatures. It would not up the contrast. Dan

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    Let me guess; contrast is up some. What developer are
    you using? If it contains hydroquinone and or glycin then
    you've a more temperature sensitive developer. At least
    hydroquinone is a high contrast component and when
    more active will up the contrast.

    I've read that glycin is a high ph metol. It is compounded
    as so. It also is reported to be usefully active at warmer
    temperatures. It would not up the contrast. Dan
    Dan: GLYCIN is p-hydroxyanilinoacetic acid.

    Glycin is a slow powerful developer which keeps well in solution. The image it produces is a warm black color and is very free from fog.

    Glycin is related to p-aminophenol and Metol.

    Compared to Metol, glycin has a carboxyl group attached to the methyl group of the Metol.

    Metol is p-(methylamino)phenol sulfate. Thus, Metol has a Sulfate attached.
    Glycin has a carboxyl group (acetic acid) attached.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson View Post
    Dan: GLYCIN is p-hydroxyanilinoacetic acid.
    Glycin is a slow powerful developer which keeps well in solution.
    The image it produces is a warm black color and is very free from
    fog. Glycin is related to p-aminophenol and Metol.
    Compared to Metol, glycin has a carboxyl group attached to the
    methyl group of the Metol.
    Metol is p-(methylamino)phenol sulfate. Thus, Metol has
    a Sulfate attached.Glycin has a carboxyl group
    (acetic acid) attached.
    All the above and to boot recommended for stand development. Dan

  8. #8

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    Agfa 8 dilution for stand development

    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    All the above and to boot recommended for stand development. Dan
    Yes Dan, and to finally answer your previous Agfa 8 question, I dilute 100 ml of Agfa 8 stock solution with 400ml of water for stand development. I develop Efke 25 for 18 minutes at 22C with Semi-Stand agitation.

    1. 2 minute presoak in 22C water.

    2. 30 seconds of gentle agitation in the developer.

    3. Stand without agitation for 9 minutes.

    4. 30 seconds of gentle agitation in the developer.

    5. Stand without agitation for the remainder of the 18 minutes.

    6. Rinse in 22C water (no acid stop bath), Fix and Wash












    i
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson View Post
    Yes Dan, and to finally answer your previous Agfa 8 question, ...
    Agfa 8? Another thread's OP interest. Mine, Kodak D-78. Dan



 

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