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  1. #41
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Thanks Donald! It tells what you get out of it but I really didn't see the why of it. Looks really impressive though. Might have to make some copy negs on big film, dig out the vacuum frame and try it out. Can copy negs be made with the proper tonal range from negatives with a shorter tonal range or will this result in an inferior product?
    Gary Beasley

  2. #42

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    glbeas,

    Also located on that same site is an article by the same author on making enlarged negatives using APHS film which is available from Freestyle. Although at the time that Bob wrote the earlier article he was engaged in working with PT-Pd and the procedure that he discribes was targeted at that process. That will explain his comments in the first article about his initial intentions were to use Azo as a proofing material but he soon discovered that the Azo prints were of a quality that merited mounting and framing.

    From what I have heard, Azo and Pt-Pd can both be printed from the same density range negative. Your question on the contrast issue will also be answered in the article about enlarged negatives.

    Additionally there are several other sites that deal with the matter of making enlarged negatives. As I recall the sites that I found were located by doing a search on platinum printing. Some of the other authors used and recommended other films then those mentioned by Bob Herbst. So the materials used can apparently vary, but consistancy seems to be the underlying thread. I hope that this directs you to the answers for your questions. Good luck.

    Regards,
    Donald Miller
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  3. #43

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    At the risk of (once again) far afield from the topic...

    Jorge,

    Can you describe scenes that to you would be more suited to pt/pd, or Azo, since you are up on both processes? For instance, the scene of the mountains you showed me, the 17x20...would you redo that on Azo or is it right as is?

    dgh
    David G Hall

  4. #44

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (David Hall @ Feb 25 2003, 08:16 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> At the risk of (once again) far afield from the topic...

    Jorge,

    Can you describe scenes that to you would be more suited to pt/pd, or Azo, since you are up on both processes? For instance, the scene of the mountains you showed me, the 17x20...would you redo that on Azo or is it right as is?

    dgh </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    Jeez....you are asking me a hard question here. As much as we try is hard to be totally detached and judge your own work, but let me give it a shot.

    If I had shown you the silver print I made of the mountains shot, you probably would have liked it more. Since I am more skilled at printing in silver there are a few things that I wish I could have done with the pt/pd print. For one the negative was not optimum for pt/pd, I am still getting the hang of this. As CArl Weese said, it is very easy to make an acceptable print in pt/pd, very hard to make a stunning print. He is correct , every time I do a printing session I find and learn new things, this is just a normal process. Having said this, I wish I had not forgotten Clays print when I met you, his is an example of a superb pt/pd print. What you saw of mine is not by any means what constitutes the best example of this process. So at this time I would say the reprint in azo with my experience in silver printing would be better, BUT I firmly believe that once you see an excellent pt/pd print, you would want to learn how to do it.

    So lately I have been eating a lot of crow, and having to go back to do the things I swore I would never do again. I am having to go back and do some testing. I found out that the BTZS is the best process to test and that actually once you get past the dry reading the method is very simple. So as much as I cuss and get discourage with pt/pd at the time, give me another year and you will see what I mean. I am finding out many things which run contrary to what I believed was good in a print. This is my opinion of course, but while I always thought the blacks and whites anchor the silver print, I am finding out the middle tones are what does it for pt/pd. If you fail to print these middle tones just right then you get the "dull and lifeless" print Smith talks about, I see a lot of this on my prints, but then I also have pt/pd prints from other people that are just perfect and no silver print could equal them.

    So I am finding out that the pt/pd process requires a more exacting technique and an almost perfect negative. With silver is so easy and there are so many tricks at your disposal that almost any negative will do, as long as you have enough detail in the shadows. As a matter of fact if I was printing with azo I would probably print in grade 3 and SLIMT it back down to 2. This produces very sparkling prints ( before you ask what SLIMT is, is a technique developed by David Katchel where you bleach the print before you develop it, this causes a reduction in contrast. BTW this can also be used to "make" azo grade 1, I am surprised azo followers don&#39;t use this technique more, at least those who keep wanting azo in grade 1).

    So to go back to the beginning of your question, the interior of a cathedral would be a perfect shot for pt/pd, for azo just about anything that you can print in enlarging paper can be done as well or better. Of course this is my opinion and your mileage may vary....

  5. #45

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    Jorge,&#39;

    Very comprehensive answer and just what I was looking for. I can visualize the interior of a cathedral in pt/pd, all airy and anchored in the midtones, as you say. Excellent. Thank you.

    dgh
    David G Hall

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