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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by kirejos View Post
    Thank you for the tips Phototone, it'll broaden my research. Do you think any of B&H's Forte stock is still good? I have a box of Polywarmtone left over from years ago, but I don't know how well the stuff "keeps".

    -Erik
    Most photopapers are good for a decade or more. I recently printed thru a couple of boxes of Agfa papers from the 1970's with good success. Freestyle still has some of their own private label stock of Polywarmtone available at good prices. Same paper as Forte, just private packaging for Freestyle.

  2. #12
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    Hi Eric: welcome aboard... You may know Kentmere under the Luminos brand name. The paper was sold under that name for many years in the US but now sells under its own name. Kentmere have been making photographic papers for just over a hundred years in the UK - with a slight diversion into damson jam making during WWI when paper supplies were restricted .

    Have fun, Bob.

  3. #13

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    Ilford Multigrade IV fiber has always been a top ranked paper. It's Dmax is high and allows one to print lighter tones easier than other papers used. Image tone is a matter of taste and not a quality issue. The contrast of your negative must match the paper contrast to record rich images. MGIV is a long scale paper vs Agfa 111. My older negatives toned for a condenser enlarger never printed well on MGIV. My new Tri-X negatives rated at 200 and developed slightly longer now fit MGIV's contrast. After the tweeks, my prints looks great on MGIV.
    RJ

  4. #14

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    Since you liked the Polywarmtone, I think you might like the Ilford Multigrade FB Warmtone, instead of the Multigrade IV.

  5. #15

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    I agree with you, kirejos. I have found multigrade IV to be an average paper. Ilford gallerie is far superior. it has a depth and sharpness to it that i cant replicate with multigrade IV (or any other paper for that matter).

  6. #16
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Again a glib comment.

    Both papers are capable of superb results, I've used Gallerie & Multigrade 4 FB, but they are quite different.

    As it happens neither are to my personal taste for my own work, but I can produce excellent prints on both if or when I want to, but more importantly I've seen superb prints from a wide variety of photographers on both papers and never heard a bad word about the multigrade FB paper since its launch over 20+ years ago.

    Ian

    Quote Originally Posted by mcfactor View Post
    I agree with you, kirejos. I have found multigrade IV to be an average paper. Ilford gallerie is far superior. it has a depth and sharpness to it that i cant replicate with multigrade IV (or any other paper for that matter).

  7. #17
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    This paper is very good IMO , I use is as a mainstay as well as Ilford WT. Very consistant batch to batch , tones beautifuly , as nice a paper as any out there.

  8. #18
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by PHOTOTONE View Post
    In regards to Ilford made paper, when I was doing a lot of b/w "art" printing about a decade ago, one of the finest papers I used was the Ilford "galerie". Don't know if it is the same now, though.
    It is; if not better. The response curve is quite different from any variable-grade paper, and it seems to suit my negatives much better.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  9. #19
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    It would be nice to stock dozens of papers to squeeze the best possible image from each negative. Learning the characteristics of many papers can be expensive and time consuming. It may be more practical to select one or a very few papers and master them completely. This may mean bypassing some shots for which our chosen papers aren't suitable. However, many of us aready bypass shots because of money, time, or equipment limitations. One more restriction shouldn't be too much of a handicap.

  10. #20

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    Multigrade IV easily has the widest contrast range of any VC paper I have tried (a list that inluces Agfa MCC/MCP, Kodak Polycontrast III and IV and Polymax II, Kentmere Fineprint, and Forte Polygrade V). And more remarkable still is that the changes in contrast with changes in filter number are quite consistent.

    I find that the paper base is quite robust (it will tolerate some mishandling in a community darkroom) and it is quite resistant to discoloration when chemical cross contamination occurrs. And I have never had any issues with defects in the paper base or emulsion (Ilford's films are a bit of another matter for me).

    But like everything else there are trade-offs and the apparent price for all the above virtues is that the paper exhibits little color shift in sepia or selenium and I find the blacks (even with the FB) to be subjectively quite weak - though a reflection densitometer may say otherwise. And that broad and even contrast range seems to oblige me to do a bit more split-filtering than I might otherwise with other VC papers that have closer spacings in their contrast range when working from the No. 2 - No. 3 1/2 filters that my negs usually print on.

    Now that I finally have my own darkroom some of the aforementioned virtues no longer apply and since most of my shooting allows me to carefully reckon my exposures, Multigrade just isn't the right paper for me.

    But let it be said that if you can't print it on Multigrade IV - you simply can't print it. I certainly understand why a lot of pros use this paper
    Digital Photography is just "why-tech" not "high tech"..

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