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  1. #1

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    ID-11 to Ilfosol S - similar results?

    I've been using ID-11 exclusively for film development. Looking for something more economical I picked up a bottle of Ilfosol S the other day (it was either that or HC-110). I've been happy with my ID-11 routine using rotary processing (unicolor drums) with about 30 seconds to a minute less development time to compensate for the increased agitation. Does anyone have any hints for switching to Ilfosol-S? Should I use the recommended development times (on the bottle or at digitaltruth.com/devchart.html )? How will my results differ, if at all, from ID-11?

    Would I be better off with HC-110?

    This will be for 120 roll film and 4x5 sheets. Ilford FP4+ and HP5+, and Efke IR820 4x5.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
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  2. #2
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I used to use Ilfosol S exclusively. It is a perfectly good developer but it can go off quickly if kept in a half filled bottle. Ilford have promised what they call a more robust version in the form of Ilfosol 3 but it has not appeared yet.

    I have changed to Ilford LC-29 which I am happy with.


    Steve.

  3. #3

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    I have used it quite a lot recently and it seems a perfectly good developer to me. As far a shelf life is concerned, I'd use a gas spray or decant into brown glass bottles and fill right up to the necks. In the UK you can buy child proof medicine bottles of various sizes which are useful.

    You may want to work out how long it will take to use up a 250ml plastic bottle. I have only ever used a gas spray to prevent oxidisation and haven't had a problem over as much as four and a half months. If my projected usage for the 250ml contents was for much longer than this, I'd decant into smaller bottles, use each and throw away any small excess.

    I have used it at mainly 1:9 but once at 1:14 as I was running out of it. Ilford mention a small trade-off in quality but I couldn't see a lot of difference but my prints are small and maybe I am easily pleased.

    I had previously used ID11 which I think has better keeping qualities once mixed and almost indefinite keeping qualities as powder. For instance, I wouldn't buy a lot of Ilfosol bottles at once unless my usage was very high.

    It's what is most convenient that counts. Looking at my negs, there's not a lot in it for me but your experience might be different.

    pentaxuser

  4. #4

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    Alright, thanks for the suggestions. I'll look into smaller bottles for storage. Where do you find a "gas spray?" I guess something like a CO2 dust blower system might work if I could find a way to keep it from coming out in explosive bursts, no? (CO2 is more dense than air if I remember correctly so filling the bottle would be feasible).
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
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  5. #5
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    My gosh, I didn't know there WAS anything cheaper than D-76/ID-11!
    Michael Sebastian
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  6. #6
    Ole
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    The cheapest developer of all was the 10 liters of Ilfotec-HC I got for $1 per bottle. The concentrate lasts a very long time, diluted 1+31 it gives very nice negatives from a LOT of film.

    CO2 is an acid which dissolves in water. It is also slightly oxidising. It is certainly NOT the right thing to use to protect developer!

    Use butane instead - that works.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
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  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole View Post
    The cheapest developer of all was the 10 liters of Ilfotec-HC I got for $1 per bottle. The concentrate lasts a very long time, diluted 1+31 it gives very nice negatives from a LOT of film.

    CO2 is an acid which dissolves in water. It is also slightly oxidising. It is certainly NOT the right thing to use to protect developer!
    Good point. I'm afraid of the flammability of butane or other hydrocarbons so I'm not keen on using that. Maybe a nitrogen tank is in order. Course that kind of defeats the purpose of using a cheap developer.

    Small bottles it is.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
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  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by walter23 View Post
    Alright, thanks for the suggestions. I'll look into smaller bottles for storage. Where do you find a "gas spray?" I guess something like a CO2 dust blower system might work if I could find a way to keep it from coming out in explosive bursts, no? (CO2 is more dense than air if I remember correctly so filling the bottle would be feasible).
    This is where the Atlantic really does divide us as I have no idea of what's available on your side of the pond. In the U.K. Protectan made by Tetenal is what I use.

    Some say this is effectively Butane or is it Propane lighter fuel. Either way if Protectan isn't available then I am sure lighter fuel would do. Sprayed straight into a bottle with a long plastic nozzle and without any naked flames in the vicinity I am sure it isn't dangerous. A short burst is all that's needed and it lasts a long time.

    If a comparable developer to IDII at the cheapest cost is of prime interest then Kodak do a powder developer which makes 5 litres, called Xtol. Alternatively ID11 comes in 5 litre packs as well. Again it a question of usage rate but you can make up 5 litres of stock solution and decant into empty silvered wine bags that you get in 3 litre wine boxes. The wine bag nozzles can be carefully levered out, the bag flushed with water then filled and returned to the wine box. As you decant the stock solution the bag simply collapses and keeps air out. No need for Protectan. 2 empty wine boxes and you're in business.My catalogue says 6 months for Xtol in full bottles which is like a wine bag but I'd suspect that it is atleast as long as this. Some Xtol users may add their actual experience here.

    I am normally teetotal but for the sake of photography force myself to drink the wine, holding my nose. The things we do for our hobby!

    pentaxuser

  9. #9

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    Hmm, what's a good boxed wine? I might have to make a weekend project of getting through a 3L box sometime. Hah. Labour of love.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
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  10. #10

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    Dear walter23,

    If you are using so much ID-11 that it is becoming too expensive, you are clearly using it up before it is going bad. Kodak D-76 is equivalent and, at the moment, is selling for about the same price per volume as Ilfosol.

    Of course, if it turns out that you like using Ilfosol, ignore everything I said! :>)

    Neal Wydra



 

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