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  1. #21
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Papantoniou View Post
    You've also got to dress your models with 70's clothes and have them model their hair in the 70's style... it can be fun...
    Tie-dyed tee shirt, love beads, bell bottom pants, boots, a joint, Alice B. Toklas brownies, black light posters, listen to Cheech and Chong, Hendrix, Joplin, Cream, drop some acid ...

    yeah that should do it!

    Welcome to APUG,
    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  2. #22
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    Welcome to Apug, always good to see people resisting the urge to take the easy way out with digital. From my own experience and glancing at books from that era (is it really old) the "style" revolved around wide angle lenses and extreme contrast and grain in the prints.
    I remember shooting Tri-X with a Pentax Spotmatic and 28mm lens, then developing it in Dektol (a paper developer) after rating it at 3200 iso. All the go at the time and it certainly had the "look".

    Cheers, Tony

  3. #23
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    Welcome to APUG. If you tell us what your camera and enlarger are, we might be able to offer more specific comments.

    Another common feature of late 60s-70s prints was the use of grade 3 paper with a condenser enlarger.
    juan

  4. #24

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    Tri-X still has the look of the 1970's, in terms of tonal response, but the grain is a lot finer. If you want the grainy 1970's look, try Rodinal for developing, or D-76 1:1.

    The other part of the 1970's look was the color films. Kodachrome 64 is not that different from it's 1978 look. But the Ektachromes have so much better color now, with less of the ice blue look. Color negative films are much better than Kodacolor-X and Kodacolor II. However, I think the color papers improved even more than the films, scanning 1960 Kodacolor negatives yields much better results than the period prints. Duplicating those murky 1970's color prints will be hard without digital post-processing.

  5. #25

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    Also, yes, 1970's cameras and optics are definitely up to snuff, so long as you avoid the early zoom lenses.

    Heck, my 1905 Pony Premo No. 4 view camera takes excellent pictures. But the lens is slow, a little faster than f/11.

  6. #26
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    what is not available nowadays compared to the 70s is some very nice chlorobromide or chloride paper to print on. I would say the best thing you could do is forget making images that look like something you think you remember and just discover what you can do now and go from there.

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