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  1. #1

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    what is this obession with 220 over 120

    What it this child like obsession with 220 film? I see begging and pleading to ilford for 220.

    I go and try some 220 (Kodak Tri-x 320) and after the 20 minutes to load it on the reel I paid $15 for just to try it, It comes out with a pale hazy backing and some purple 'flame' marks on the edge of a single frame.

    Did it exhaust the developer or fixer??


    I Think i stick with 120 for now

  2. #2
    Aurelien's Avatar
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    I am sorry, but usually there is no difference between 120 and 220. I often use 320TXP in 220, and I have never had any problem with it. Neiter with introducing it in the reel, nor with chemicals.
    Why this obsession? because double autonomy!
    Aurelien, Analog Photographer

    the analog place to be

  3. #3
    BarryWilkinson's Avatar
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    Like Aurelien I have also never had a problem with 220. It loads as easily as 120 and does not require me to change film every 8-10 exposures.

    Barry

  4. #4

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    The reason for 220? I guess you have never shot fashion or a wedding

  5. #5
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    Most cameras require a mechanical setting change to switch between the two sizes as 220 doesn't have backing paper for it's entire length. Apart from that, as others have said, it means less film changing. The film itself is the same.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  6. #6
    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    As a portrait photographer, I would love to have more b/w options in 220 format. You need to be sure the camera is set to 220, and were you using a 220 sized reel when you developed the film?

  7. #7

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    If you use larger formats 220 become that much more enticing. 6x9 only gives you 8 shots per 120. 220 gets you back to 16. Just like many 645 cameras do with 120.

  8. #8

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    If you'd ever done a two or three week trip with rollfilm you'd understand the advantages of carrying/managing half the number of rolls as well as reducing the probability that you need to reload in the middle of an engaging sequence. I think you need to reconsider "childlike".

  9. #9

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    Tri-X is Tri-X no matter how long the roll is. The reasons for using 220 are well stated.
    As for the hazy backing and purple stains you encountered, it sounds like you may not have fixed it long enough or maybe your fixer was exhausted.
    220 reels can be a little tricky to load, and take some practice. Some folks like to load two 120 rolls onto a 220 reel, which can be very helpful if you have a number of rolls to process.

  10. #10
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    If you make a lot of exposures, longer rolls of film are handy.

    Aside from cutting down film changes, you can easily develop twice as many exposures in the same time (It's possible to put two rolls of 120 on a 220 reel, but it seems riskier than just shooting 220, if you can). If you've ever come home from a trip (or a fashion or wedding shoot, if you do that) with more than 20 rolls of 120 to process, and you don't want to maintain a 3.5 gallon tank line, then 220 starts looking very attractive.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

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