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Thread: Rinsing film

  1. #1

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    Rinsing film

    Just learned a (for me) new method for rinsing film.....
    One fill with water .. 10 times aggregation... second fill and 20 times aggregation ... third fill and 15 times aggregation.....
    Somebody called it the ilford way.....
    Normally I rinse my film 1/2 hour... it takes a lot of water and the 'Ilford method' much less water. But do any of you know anything about The Ilford way (or is it called something else?)

    erik

  2. #2
    clogz's Avatar
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    The Ilford Method is what I use. Some thorough research can be found here: http://www.largeformatphotography.in.../com_rolf.html

    Hans
    Digital is best taken with a grain of silver.

  3. #3
    Sparky's Avatar
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    The only problem with this method is that it assumes the thiosulfate has an equal attraction for the water as it does for the film emulsion - which I think is maybe fallacious. I really LOVE the idea- though think it should be amended with the addition of a hypo clear rinse - thus the problem will be transferred to the remove of the hypo clearing solution.

  4. #4
    clogz's Avatar
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    It would be very nice if the Ilford/Harman people could comment on this.

    Hans
    Digital is best taken with a grain of silver.

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    My husband would like that and it may buy me some more darkroom time. We're in drought conditions and he keeps reminding me that there are water restrictions in neighboring counties. I'll give it a try!

  6. #6
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    It has been discussed on this forum several times before, so a search may reveal the threads. The "Ilford Method" has been successfully used for many years, so there is no need to modify it or doubt it's veracity.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  7. #7

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    I use the "Ilford method". I have for years with no ill effects. Saves water and time too.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

  8. #8
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    I have been using this Ilford method for years and years, works beautifully. We too have extremely low water supplies in many parts of this country and in some areas there is just no water.

    For quite some time I was using running water using the Jobo hose with the air inlet which induced aeration and agitated the water. This supposedly reduced the running water from about 30 minutes to 5 minutes. I had nothing to lose at the time, water was in very short supply as it hadn't rained in over 1 year in that section of the country. This did work, but I was still worried about archival washing of film.

    At this stage I read the Ilford method in a magazine and decide to give it a go. What I found interesting was that the amount of time taken to do the required inversions and fill ups was almost identical to the 5 minute wash with the Jobo hose.

    I have used this Ilford method ever since, except when rotary processing, where I use a modified version of the Ilford method on the processor taking about 5 1/2 minutes.

    Mick.

  9. #9
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    I think it is probably safe to assume that Ilford will have tested this method before releasing it to the world and that they tested it with lab equipment, and experienced chemists who know how to use it, far in excess of that available to any of us who are not (a) chemists and (b) work in a well equipped development lab. It is their reputation that is on the line after all. The only thing I would like to see is information that it has been tested lately by Ilford on modern films.

    Depending on how I feel at the time I may use the Ilford method or use running water via a hose into the tank. Having said that, like I suspect many people who use the method, I still give one extra 20 inversion cycle "just for luck" and leave the film to soak in the Photoflo for a couple of minutes ...

    Cheers, Bob.

  10. #10
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    L. F. A. Mason, in his book "Photographic Chemistry" does not use this method AFAIK. I have posted this before. He was a member of the Ilford research staff.

    PE

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