Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,465   Posts: 1,570,674   Online: 876
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    bonk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Shooter
    Med. Format Pan
    Posts
    129
    Images
    3

    better use distilled water?

    Is there any advantage (or even disadvantage) in using distilled water for mixing a) developer b)stop bath c) fixer or d)wetting agent? I can always get as much as I want for free, so I thought maybe its a good idea since the water is really clean.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Abu Dhabi UAE
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    30
    Hi, I always use tap water for dev, stop & fix but have found distilled water to be 100% better for wetting agent -in fact my negs hve been 100% clean since doing this about a yer ago.

  3. #3
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,467
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    437
    If you can get an infinite supply for free, there's no reason not to use it. For certain developers, distilled water is critical for making the stock solution. For stop and fix, it is generally irrelevant which kind of water you use, so long as your tap water does not have an extreme Ph.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Valley Stream, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,216
    Is your tap water fit to drink? If you let a container of tap water sit for a few hours, do you find sediment on the bottom? If you can answer yes to the first question and no to the second, then your tap water is perfectly fine for photographic use.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Chicago, Western Suburbs
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,453
    Hi Bonk,

    The advantage is you will know what you've got. Many (most?) have no problems using tap water but I consider it cheap insurance. I use it for everything but wash water (I use distilled for the final rinse with wetting agent as well).

    Neal Wydra

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Van Buren, Arkansas
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,412
    Images
    101
    Commercial photo chemicals (either powders such as D-76, or liquid concentrates) have components in them to allow them to work fine with a wide variety of water. If you are mixing up "custom" chemicals from individual components then distilled water is best.

  7. #7
    Murray Kelly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Brisbane, QLD. Australia
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    429
    The de-ionisedwater at all motor suppliers is by far the best insurance against local water incompatibility problems with developer mixes. After that, tap water is 'probably ' fine.

    I have had troubles with wash water here - it is terribly hard and I have had to add Calgon to avoid unusual effects.

    Murray Kelly

  8. #8
    Monophoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Saratoga Springs, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,691
    Images
    44
    I strongly advocate use of distilled (or RO filtered) water for mixing PhotoFlo for the final rinse. Pure water results in clean negatives.

    I also keep a supply of distilled water for use in diluting chemicals for Pt/Pd printing. The chemicals are so expensive that I want to make sure there is no chance of contamination based on water quality.

    But for the other chemicals, ordinary tap water is fine.
    Louie

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    London, England
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    70
    I have been experimenting with distilled water and filtered tap water for the final rinse (with wash-aid). Strangely, I've had more problems with the distilled water than with the filtered water. Not sure if this is because the previous steps were in filtered water (in a hard water area) but I'm not bothering with distilled water any more.

  10. #10
    tac
    tac is offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Appalachia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    246
    I have two darkrooms that I use on a regular basis, one in the central Appalachians, and the other in Manhattan. I have always mixed D76 from tap water at both. Early on, I discovered that I needed to use drastically different development times for each location, for identical film (mostly Tri-x and TMY), exposed with the same meters and cameras.

    After eliminating all other variables that I could (e.g., using two Kodak Process thermometers, calibrated together, using fresh d76 from same batch), I was forced to conclude that the pH and mineral content of the two water sources was the culprit.

    With adjustment, I can create identical negatives at either location, but the difference is about 2 minutes +/- development time.

    I assume that distilled for mixing developer would be standard everywhere and thus eliminate this situation, but I never bothered, just used the time adjustment.

    I do, however, use distilled for final rinse in wetting agent, and for the critical parts of alternative processes. I think that if I had free access to unlimited distilled, I would use it for almost everything.
    Good Luck and Have Fun!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin