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  1. #11
    sterioma's Avatar
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    Has anybody any experience on how Neutol WA behaves with neutral tone papers (e.g. Ilford Multigrade RC MGIV)?

    I am just a beginner, trying to limit my films, film developers, papers and paper developers combinations to a bare a minimum. Specifically, I would like to use only a single type of paper in various sizes (that is Ilford MGIV RC pearl for now), and maybe use a neutral and a warm tone developer (Neutol WA is readily available locally while ilford is not) when I want to give a warmer look.
    Stefano Ricciardi
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  2. #12
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Stefano, neutral tone papers aren't really affected by warm tone developers and its unlikely you'd see any difference. A warm tone paper can be developed to give warm or cold tones but the reverse isn't possible.

    You would be better to standardise on a warm-tone paper.

    Ian

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by sterioma View Post
    Has anybody any experience on how Neutol WA behaves with...MGIV RC?...
    I have used this combination and it does produce a moderately warm tone.

    My current favorite combination is Galerie in Neutol WA. This pairing results in an image tone that, while not obviously warm unless compared side-by-side to a dead-neutral print, does contain a hint of warmth. It's just enough to completely avoid the green one gets with Dektol-like developers and thereby precludes the need for toning.

    I know you're trying to limit yourself to MGIV RC, but encourage you to try Galerie when moving on to fiber-based papers.

  4. #14
    sterioma's Avatar
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    Ian, Sal, thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by Sal Santamaura View Post

    I know you're trying to limit yourself to MGIV RC, but encourage you to try Galerie when moving on to fiber-based papers.
    I understand Galerie is a graded paper. If I remember correctly from The Print it was one of Ansel Adams favorites.
    I guess it'll be a while before I'll be able to
    a) process fibre based prints (it looks it takes substantially more time, and money for that matter, that is some kind of print washer, maybe a press, etc...)
    b) be able to have my exposure/development process under control to be able to use graded papers.

    But the travel is going to be fun
    Stefano Ricciardi
    My photos on Flickr

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by sterioma View Post
    ...thank you!...it looks it takes substantially more time, and money for that matter, that is some kind of print washer, maybe a press, etc...be able to have my exposure/development process under control to be able to use graded papers...
    You're welcome!

    When ready to try Galerie, don't let lack of a print washer or press hold you back. You can substitute patience for both. A small number of prints can be washed in trays, either with a tray siphon or simply by changing water manually. Be aware that there will be about 10% dry-down of the print values and, due to emulsion swelling when wet, things will look blurry. Sharpness will return when dry.

    To flatten the dry prints, simply place them under a stack of books. The longer they stay there the flatter they'll be. Depending on how low humidity was when they were air-dried, anywhere from a couple of days to a few weeks will work just as well as a press.

    It's definitely good to have one's exposure/development process under control. However, Galerie is available in grades 2 and 3, so there's some flexibility available during printing. Targeting one's negatives to a lower than "N" contrast works well in this situation, especially with 35mm or 120 film. I'm currently using Delta 100 sheets, developed in Perceptol 1:3 to a contrast index of 0.51 for full-sun scenes, then printed on grade 2 Galerie in 1:7 Neutol WA. These are the the most satifsying prints I've made in nearly 40 years of darkroom dabbling.

    Enjoy your journey.

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