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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    South Pasadena, CA USA
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    470
    I just finished developing some negatives, and I noticed something interesting.

    Of five negatives developed in a Jobo Expert in Rollo Pyro, two came out with highlights that seemed a little thin. All of the negatives were exposed at the same time, in controlled light, and of course developed at the same time for the same time, temp, rotation, etc. because they were all together in the Jobo.

    How can this be? How can two negatives have thinner highlights, and the other five seem perfect? They're all printable, just seem to be developed differently.

    HP5 film, if it matters.

    dgh
    David G Hall

  2. #2
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
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    Ipswich, Massachusetts, USA
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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (David Hall @ Mar 5 2003, 11:59 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> All of the negatives were exposed at the same time, in controlled light, and of course developed at the same time for the same time, temp, rotation, etc.&nbsp; because they were all together&nbsp; in the Jobo.

    How can this be?&nbsp; How can two negatives have thinner highlights, and the other five seem perfect?&nbsp; They&#39;re all printable, just seem to be developed differently.

    </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    Hmm ... off the top of my head, I would suspect the volume of chemistry - that might be a factor if it was roll film, but it is far less likely with sheet film in an expert drum. Difficult to say now, I would imagine, but were the highlights oriented toward the center of the tank? If so, volume might be the answer.

    But then again ... It could be that static electric charges originating in the Crab Nebula were exceptionally strong on a day where there was a particular alignment with Venus and the Cygnus Galaxy....
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.



 

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