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  1. #21
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    Next photochem order, I'll just get a legitimate bottle of TEA or PG, tbd. Don't need much at a time anyway. I was thinking gallons because of the buckets of other things I bought from chemically and ritually impure sources..

    Water will do for the time being with acetaminophen.

    Anhydrous alcohol, stirring and patience will do with initial phenidone work. Web data sheets say it dissolves in hot water, but it must take more patience than photographers have.

    Muray
    Murray

  2. #22

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    [QUOTE=Murray@uptowngallery;568865]Next photochem order, I'll just get a legitimate bottle of TEA or PG, tbd. Don't need much at a time anyway. I was thinking gallons because of the buckets of other things I bought from chemically and ritually impure sources..

    Water will do for the time being with acetaminophen.

    Phenidone will dissolve in alcohol (the drier the alcohol, the better) but the alcohol will grab water molecules and the Phenidone will start dying.

    Better to use a Glycol or Glycerin as the Phenidone solvent.

    Water won't do the job by itself with acetaminophen. You will need to react the acetaminophen with water and a base to get the chemical that you really want (p-aminophenol). Easier to buy a few grams of p-aminophenol from Photographer's Formulary
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  3. #23
    gainer's Avatar
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    A brisker oven, such as is used for rising bread dough, is a handy thing to have. It keeps a constant 104 F . Solvents like glycerin and TEA are so viscous at 70 F that you think they are not disolving the chems that should dissolve. My impatience was probably the reason for my using such inordinately high temperatures when I first started experimenting with organic solvents. Now if an experiment fails, I can console myself with a loaf of home made bread.
    Gadget Gainer

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