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  1. #11
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    walter23 -

    xray films are sold as blue- or green- sensitive. For their intended purpose, they're placed in a purpose-made holder that has a phosphor coating. The specimen/body-density-modulated xray cone (analogous to one made with lightlight) hits the xray filmholder which emits the light to which the film is sensitive. I think there is some sensitivity to UV also. Not sensitive to dark red (typical xray lab safe light color).

    The double emulsion and double phosphor panel is supposed to reduce the required dosage to which a person might be exposed.

    I acquired a box of medical film repackaged for a circuit board inspection company. I'm hoping they selected one of the single emulsion films, which are hard for us inventive types to identify.

    Agfa id'ed for me which of their xray films are single emulsion, but I'd have to look for it. I haven't seen those films sold at any of the discount xray-film-R-us kind of places I see on the web.
    Murray

  2. #12

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    Oh really? The film doesn't actually respond to X-ray radiation, just some kind of secondary visible or near-visible radiation caused by a substance in the film holder? Cool.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
    .

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by walter23 View Post
    Weird; I've never heard of this before. I take it X-ray film is sensitive to visible (or near-visible) light?
    Absolutely. X-ray film is sensitive to Blue visible light, just like the earliest photographic processes, such as daguerrotype and wet plate. It is not X-rays that directly expose X-ray film, but rather it is a flourescent screen that is in contact with the film. The X-rays cause the screen to glow in proportion to the X-ray strength, thus exposing film, which is processed just about like any b/w negative film. Much, if not most X-ray film is coated with a light-sensitive emulsion on both sides, to increase sensitivity, and is sandwiched between two flourescent screens.

    The primary appeal of using X-ray film for pictorial use is the nostalgic tonal reproduction it gives, being only sensitive to the blue end of the spectrum, which causes the images to resemble early photography, and its cheapness. A 100 sheet box of 8x10 X-ray film can easily be purchased for less than $30.

  4. #14
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    Also, look for Christian Nze here. He has some good anecdotal info on a couple types of film with respect ISO, processing and even which ones benefit from preflashing like paper negatives.

    I'm sure he is not the only person successfully using it, but his is the finest work I've seen (granted, on the web) using xray film. You will probably need to have him identify which still lifes he shot with xray film vs regular, but he uses incandescent lighting & doesn't like the spectral response outdoors...depends what you're doing I guess.

    Murray

    ---------------------
    From email with Christian:

    I develop Agfa in rodinal 1+50 @ 20°C for 4 minutes
    but for Kodak I'll prefer PMK or abc pyro both 5minutes.

    I use to put a glass plate in the bottom of my tray to avoid scratching the film surface. If I don't put the plate in face of the film is really scratched. I think the film is not hardened.
    -------------------------------
    Some of his xray film images: (he does shoot some 11x14 I think, but I don't know if it's these (how would he scan?))

    Here is a list of Xray film photography made with kodak or Agfa Xray film coated on both face
    http://cnze.club.fr/images/stillife/FS1SH02.JPG
    http://cnze.club.fr/images/stillife/FS2SH02.JPG
    http://cnze.club.fr/images/stillife/FS3SH02.JPG
    http://cnze.club.fr/images/stillife/FS4SH02.JPG
    http://cnze.club.fr/images/stillife/FS7SH02.JPG
    http://cnze.club.fr/images/stillife/FS12SH02.JPG
    http://cnze.club.fr/images/stillife/FS13SH02.JPG
    http://cnze.club.fr/images/stillife/FS14SH02.JPG
    http://cnze.club.fr/images/stillife/ST8.JPG
    http://cnze.club.fr/images/stillife/ST9.JPG

    That last one almost makes me want to eat pears, & I don't like pears.
    Last edited by Murray@uptowngallery; 10-13-2007 at 09:21 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Murray

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by walter23 View Post
    Weird; I've never heard of this before. I take it X-ray film is sensitive to visible (or near-visible) light?
    Yes, IR film is too.

    John

  6. #16

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    Shot a couple of sheets. Still dialing in Film speed and processing times. The stuff I shot @ ISO 50 was over expo'd, 100 or 200 is probably better. Scratches if you look at it cross-eyed, and I've had some staining problems from photoflo, where I never do with other films.

    John

  7. #17

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    Phototone, I've searched all through the posts, but are you guys that are shooting the blue sensitive xray film using coated or uncoated lenses. It seems as though this stuff will work as wetplate, so should a wetplate type lens be used.

    Has anyone had experience with the Green/Blue sensitive with coated lenses and filters?

    Going to order some in the morning as I shoot 14x17 and this is a huge cash of film(cheap), with potential.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by PBrooks View Post
    Phototone, I've searched all through the posts, but are you guys that are shooting the blue sensitive xray film using coated or uncoated lenses. It seems as though this stuff will work as wetplate, so should a wetplate type lens be used.

    Has anyone had experience with the Green/Blue sensitive with coated lenses and filters?

    Going to order some in the morning as I shoot 14x17 and this is a huge cash of film(cheap), with potential.
    X-ray film should work with coated or uncoated lenses. I have not shot a sheet with an uncoated lens, but I will, as I have several 19th century lenses to try. I do know that modern coated lenses work just fine with Xray film.

  9. #19

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    PBrooks, here are two samples with an uncoated lens on green sensitive x-ray film. I use x-ray with caffenol so it has some odd effects on the emulsion.
    Last edited by Brian Bullen; 10-31-2008 at 09:40 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20

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    When I get X-rays done by my dentist...they stick a piece of film in my mouth -- about the size of a 35mm slide....does that little filmholder also have some kind of phosphor in it...or is it directly sensitive to X-rays?

    I just ordered my free sample of 14x17 "wide latitude" ortho X-ray film

    are we going to get a million spam emails and marketing phone calls as a result of ordering free samples?

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