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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkroomExperimente View Post
    When I get X-rays done by my dentist...they stick a piece of film in my mouth -- about the size of a 35mm slide....does that little filmholder also have some kind of phosphor in it...or is it directly sensitive to X-rays?

    I just ordered my free sample of 14x17 "wide latitude" ortho X-ray film

    are we going to get a million spam emails and marketing phone calls as a result of ordering free samples?
    Maybe, maybe not. It doesn't take much X-ray dose to X-ray teeth..however the chest X-ray dose would be much higher without the glowing phospher film holders the film is loaded into for that use.

  2. #22

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    thanks

    I also ordered some single-emulsion 8x10 film, although that particular site is aimed at Doctors...so they might ignore my request ( mad scientists don't count ).

  3. #23
    nze
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    It work quite well , but different filmhave quite different sebsibility from 25 iso to 800 ISO . I only use them for still life with a 200Watt tungsten light with exposure range from 5 SEc to 5 min depening on the film.
    I mostly develop in Rodinal or ABC pyro. I never forget to put a plate of glass in the bottom of my tray to avoid scratch and make all the step in the same tray( change the solution not the tray) . you mays also change of tray by taking te film with the glass plate. I often harden the film at the end of the process.

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  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkroomExperimente
    When I get X-rays done by my dentist...they stick a piece of film in my mouth -- about the size of a 35mm slide....does that little filmholder also have some kind of phosphor in it...or is it directly sensitive to X-rays?
    I asked my dentist for a few of those dental X-Ray packets last year sometime, and I opened them up. It's a plastic case, with a piece of film and a [very] thin piece of metal foil on both sides of the film. There doesn't appear to be any type of a phosphor in there.

    Now that I think of it, I'm going to see if I can find the remaining sheets and shoot them; they'd fit right in the film gate of a 35mm camera.

    They've now switched to digital X-Ray capture :-( , so I've lost my source of those films.

    nze, that's a fantastic idea with the glass plate; I never even considered doing something like that. Do you stick the film to the glass before processing, or just use it to protect the film from the base of the tray?

  5. #25

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    my Dentist is a photographer, so he still uses X-ray film...I keep meaning to ask him to X-ray something for me -- anything, just so I'll have used that part of the spectrum

  6. #26
    nze
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    Don't need to stick the film to the glass. glass will not scratch film and the second emulsion helpp to build up density even in the low light.
    Chris Nze
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  7. #27
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    I guess I must have figured I needed to end the year with one more bone-head move.

    After cutting down a sheet of 8x10 green-sensitive x-ray film (repackaged Kodak, if the seller is to believed), I shot a few table-top set-ups in 4x5 to test exposure - regular room light, 8 sec. exposure. Shot at 100, it went in the Uni-Color drum with a couple of sheets of Foma 100 and some Rodinal 1/50. Everything seemed to work out fine. So... figuring the usable starting film speed as ASA 100, I set up the 8x10 to test a lens or two for coverage at infinity. This time I shot out the door of my studio at the new fallen snow. Same development process, two seriously cooked negatives! Gee! do you think the blue and green light outside might be a bit stronger than that old yellow bulb hanging over the table??? Gotta be at least 2 stops overexposed. Doesn't do much to tame the contrast that way either.

    Of course, I may have made some other errors along the way as well, using a packard shutter on the 8x10, but the meter was the same and I used the "instant" setting.

    Ah, well.. live and learn. Happy New Year

  8. #28

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    No doubt about it, your outside exposures should be less, to compensate for the much higher degree of light in the blue end of the spectrum.

  9. #29
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    I used xray film from agfa and another from dupont for some time because i got it free (the end of the roll of xray cine film we used for coronary angiography) . I posted an image for you in the main gallery titled "orthopods". I don't know how to put it here . I use a light red filter outside so that the inside and outside e.i. were close... about 160 with this agfa shot ...


    Miles

  10. #30

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    A lot of radiography work these days is not done with film (or with digital semiconductor arrays, either). Image Plates (often flexible) are coated with Photostimulable Luminescence Phosphors (PSP), (PSL). These Image Plates can be exposed with any Xray source. They are then DEVELOPED by laser photostimulation. This technology was pioneered by Fuji in the 1980s and is now in widespread use. Kodak and AGFA adopted this technology as well.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

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