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  1. #11
    fhovie's Avatar
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    Mar 2003
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    Port Hueneme, California - USA
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    My darkroom is also not hooked up to house plumbing. I have 50 gallons of storage and a large sink. RC papers don't need much, they go in a first 5 gal bucket with a little sulfite and a second 5 gal bucket for 10 minutes. 10 gal of water to wash up to 20 8x10 or equivalent. For fiber, I fill the sink. It is about 20 Gallons, I can set 11x14 on their edges completely submerged. After the first 5 gal bucket with sulfite for 6 to 10 minutes they go in the sink for 30 or more minutes. There is a lot of water in there and the dilution of Thiosulfate that remains in that wash water would have to be very low. I do up to 15 11x14 or equivalent that way in a printing session.
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  2. #12

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    Sep 2002
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    Willamette Valley, Oregon
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    [QUOTES=rmolson;532939]
    "Water conservation. Lately I have become very aware
    of water conservation. I already use a 12 gt (3gallon)
    Plastic container filled and used for tempering the fix,
    mixing the developer for one shot ,rinse and final
    wash of Ilford’s 5,10,15,20 inversions in my 16
    ounce film tank. The remaining water is used
    for clean up of the tank and reels."

    I read it: Start to finish and all associated activities,
    processing one roll of film requires 3 gallons of water.
    I count 7 pints for the processing itself. You could
    save 1 pint by using Ilford's 5-10-20 sequence. A
    follow up Photo Flo should count as a wash.

    "But when it comes to prints that is a different matter.
    Using RC paper the final 5 minute wash uses about 4
    gallons (ball park figure)."

    After fix I gave RC prints a 1-2-3 minute wash sequence.
    For 8x10s figure about 1/3 quart per wash. That 4 gallons
    at that rate will do 16 8x10s. If you hold after fix then
    batch wash, keep water volume sufficient for easy
    handling and no more. Two post hold washes
    may do.

    "But fiber paper using a washing aid and a 30 minute
    minimum wash uses 24 gallons. I ‘d like to reduce that
    even further. I don’t see anything in online literature
    about any method similar to Ilford’s film washing
    techniques….any one?"

    If I were to wash 5 8x10s using my wash method it
    would require 1, ONE, gallon. Actually 4 liters as I've
    gone all metric in the lab. A post-fix routine of rinse,
    hca, and hold with separators would precede
    the washing. Dan

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Phoeinx Arizona
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    [QUOTES=rmolson;532939]
    "Water conservation. Lately I have become very aware
    of water conservation. I already use a 12 gt (3gallon)
    Plastic container filled and used for tempering the fix,
    mixing the developer for one shot ,rinse and final
    wash of Ilford’s 5,10,15,20 inversions in my 16
    ounce film tank. The remaining water is used
    for clean up of the tank and reels."

    I read it: Start to finish and all associated activities,
    processing one roll of film requires 3 gallons of water.
    I count 7 pints for the processing itself. You could
    save 1 pint by using Ilford's 5-10-20 sequence. A
    follow up Photo Flo should count as a wash.

    "But when it comes to prints that is a different matter.
    Using RC paper the final 5 minute wash uses about 4
    gallons (ball park figure)."

    After fix I gave RC prints a 1-2-3 minute wash sequence.
    For 8x10s figure about 1/3 quart per wash. That 4 gallons
    at that rate will do 16 8x10s. If you hold after fix then
    batch wash, keep water volume sufficient for easy
    handling and no more. Two post hold washes
    may do.

    "But fiber paper using a washing aid and a 30 minute
    minimum wash uses 24 gallons. I ‘d like to reduce that
    even further. I don’t see anything in online literature
    about any method similar to Ilford’s film washing
    techniques….any one?"

    If I were to wash 5 8x10s using my wash method it
    would require 1, ONE, gallon. Actually 4 liters as I've
    gone all metric in the lab. A post-fix routine of rinse,
    hca, and hold with separators would precede
    the washing. Dan

    Have you tested for risdual hypo? I use Perma Wash and my single wt is good after 7 mints and double wt after 10 mints.

  4. #14
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    Aug 2006
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    Misissauaga Canada
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    Conserve in other areas, and you will have heaps of darkroom water 'free'

    We put in 3 low flow (6l or under) toilets, a low flow shower head, and run the dishwasher only when it is full (had to buy another set of 8 flatware to make that one work). Water the garden by hand with a watering can, so that the water only hits the plants. Put the sprinkler on the lawn when it goes brown and crunchy. Wash with a full load in the washing machine, about 2 loads a week for a family of four most weeks. We change the bedsheets and launder them infrequnetly, since we usually shower before going to bed.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Willamette Valley, Oregon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Howell View Post
    Have you tested for risdual hypo?

    I use Perma Wash and my single wt is good after
    7 mints and double wt after 10 mints.
    I use the HT-2 test for residual hypo and the
    ST-1 test for residual silver.

    What is that "good after 7 mints ... after 10 mints"?
    That much time in the hca? Dan

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Willamette Valley, Oregon
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    Quote Originally Posted by BWGirl View Post
    I know this works, because I took the prints I'd made
    & rinsed this way to a toning class this year, where we
    were told that toning was one sure way of showing all the
    faults in your rinse methods. Mine had no problems.
    I'm not so sure toning is "one sure way of showing all the
    faults in your rinse methods". Selenium and sulfide toners
    will show a stain if residual silver is left in the emulsion.
    They will not show stain if residual fixer is left in the
    emulsion.

    A standard test for residual fixer is the HT-2 test. Residual
    fixer above a very minute amount will produce a stain when
    a drop or two of the silver nitrate solution is applied.

    To test for silver left in the emulsion drops of sulfide or
    selenium are used; the sulfur for silver test, ST-1.

    To test for sulfur, fix, drops of a silver solution are used;
    the silver for sulfur test, HT-2.

    Two simple tests all should have at hand. Dan

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