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  1. #1
    Harry Lime's Avatar
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    Gevaluxe printing paper

    http://www.silverprint.co.uk/News05_5.htm

    Saw this on the http://www.silverprint.co.uk/ site

    Gevaluxe. A a bromide paper with a very warm base, but a surface, which resembles velvet and works in the same way as velvet when illuminated.

    Has anyone ever seen a print made on this paper? It look like it would be very interesting.


  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    There was a later matt Agfa-Gevaert paper that looked like satin, Portriga. I only used it once but it was quite amazing. Record rapid was the same emulsion.

    Ian

  3. #3

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    Some remarks to this wonderful paper. When you look at it, it is always matt – deep matt – deeeep matt as sandpaper. This paper dated from around 1955. There must exist a patent number of it, but until now I didnt found it, I was looking for Mr Reed. The first I found, but not the real Gevaert Patent, is:
    Velourpaper from A. Doman, Poland, Polish Patent 23724 from 11.12.1934.

    In an article of "Bild und Ton", 5/1959, page 142 about (translated) "How to matt photographic papers" from Dr. Holbe, Gevaluxe is mentioned, that the very expensive electrostatic (in german Beflockung = to put flaky - fluffy parts on a surface) "Beflockung" with cellulosederivats of special length is in no proportion to the commercial result of the paper.

    Perhaps Mr. J. Knöfel, DRP 686070 from IG-Farben 17.3.1937, has to do with Gevalux.

    In Gevaert-Books, 2 in german from 1938 and 1956, Gevalux is mentioned, in english I have the first english edition from 1930? where Gevalux is not mentioned.
    The most important from the instructions for Gevalux:
    Never touch surface! Do not touch with another paper the surface in the devel.-bath. Original recept G.251 for normal negatives 2 minutes
    water 40°C 800ccm
    metol 1,5 gr
    natriumsulfit sic 25 gr
    hydrochinon 6 gr
    soda sic 40 gr
    kaliumbromid 1 gr
    to 1 liter

    for hard negatives recept G.253 2 minutes
    water 40°C 800ccm
    metol 3 gris
    natriumsulfit sic 20 gr
    soda sic 20 gr
    kaliumbromid 1 gr
    to 1 liter

    1 liter fresh developer are for 0,5 squaremeter Gevaluxe-paper, not more, because this paper need more developer than other papers.
    Fixing is 20 to 30 minutes in normal acid na-thiosulfatbathes allways fresh, 1 liter fixbath is for 1 up to 1,5 sqm Gevalux-paper. Important by fix are the first 30 secondes - good agitation is necessary.

    Washing: 1 up to 1,5 hours.
    Drying: hang on a line

    The interesting is, you get with this over 50 year old paper, storage was always normal room temperature, a correct gradation without fog.

  4. #4
    patrickjames's Avatar
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    I have two boxes of 11x14 I have been keeping. The paper is quite extraordinary since the blacks are about as black as you can get. No light reflects off of the shadows at all. It is quite a unique paper.

    I was thinking of selling it if anyone is interested. Like all the old "classic" paper I have, I just never get around to using it.

    Patrick

  5. #5
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    I have a book of Laura Gilpin's work that has reproductions of prints she made on Gevalux in the 1930s. She was primarily a platinum printer but used the paper sometimes. Actually referring to it as "Siver bromide print made on Gevalux"
    DP

  6. #6
    Harry Lime's Avatar
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    It reaaally looks interesting. I wonder if there would be a market for something like this today.

  7. #7
    AgX
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    I wondered about this too.

    But PE once stated that was the consumer not the industry who caused the range of surfaces to decline.

  8. #8
    AgX
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    Concerning the spelling: It's -luxe.
    Obviously referring to luxury.

  9. #9

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    A quote from the Gevaert Manual of Photography (1958) concerning Gevaluxe.

    Gevaluxe is a sliver bromide paper which because of its distinctive surface is quite different from any other bromide paper. This surface is made up of a close network of minute fibres, like a velvet fabric, which, in fact, it closely resembles. (The manufacturing process has been patented in all countries.) The advantage of this surface lies in the almost complete elimination of the specular reflection peculiar to glossy prints, and of the slight veil of diffused light which restricts the depth of the blacks in matt papers. Only the light reflected by the image reaches the eye. The emulsion of Gevaluxe possesses properties which when combined with those of its surface yield images of superb gradation, with blacks attaining a depth as rich as that of black velvet. The stereoscopic effect thus produced is quite remarkable, and cannot be achieved with any other paper. Indeed, the term 'three dimensional' has been very aptly applied to Gevaluxe.

    This velvet-like surface has still further advantages. It hides to a large degree grain in the negative and gives the picture an "unmistakable air of distinction and quality".

    Image tone: Neutral black. Gevaluxe is supplied on cream card base only.

  10. #10

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    More on Gevaluxe from the Gevart Manual of Photography (1958)

    Many pictorial photographers consider Gevaluxe the perfect medium for the expression of artistic conceptions. While this field offers great possibilities there are many others. For example, because of its life-like rendering of light and shade and of the generally superior appearance of a Gevaluxe print, this 'de luxe' paper is beling used more and more for pictures in modern decoration. An attractive photograph on Gevaluxe could never be mistaken for a machine product and retains all the distinction of an original picture. For this reason it is used to a considerable extent for high-class portraiture and wedding photographs, as well as for commercial work that is to be displayed in exhibitions, entrance halls, reception rooms, etc.

    One of the most interesting applications is for reproductions of paintings, to which this rich paper lends itself particularly well.

    Some of the best results on Gevaluxe are obtained with subjects displaying bright highlights next to wide areas of deep shadow. This paper is not recommended for 'high-key' subjects.
    Last edited by PHOTOTONE; 10-18-2007 at 01:07 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spell check

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