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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by rusty71 View Post
    Wasn't it just repackaged AGFA APX 400? Not sure it it was actually a Forte emulsion.
    You might be thinking of Efke 400. I haven't seen anything definitive on that, but I've seen suggestions that it was an Agfa emulsion (although some claim it's not APX 400, but something similar from Agfa).

  2. #12
    juan's Avatar
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    I like it well enough in Pyrocat HD, but as others have pointed out, there will not be any more of it.
    juan

  3. #13
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I'll chime in an decloak that I like it a lot. But that just goes to prove how different people like different things.
    I second Roger's post. Great tonality, which is why I love it. I used it with Rodinal and Pyrocat-HD. I preferred the Pyrocat-HD, it seemed to control the highlights better. I used it in sheet film, and my 11x14 prints from those negatives are very sharp.
    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #14

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    Is there something similar to the forte400 since they're gone now, or is that just tri-x?

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by sage View Post
    Is there something similar to the forte400 since they're gone now, or is that just tri-x?

    In large-format sizes, ISO 400 films are Tri-X, T-Max 400, Ilford HP-5+.

    T-Max 400 has just been improved.

  6. #16

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    In roll film and 35mm film, in addition to above, you could add Fuji Neopan 400, which is a favorite of mine.

  7. #17
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Forte 400 was most similar to Tri-X.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #18
    Charlie-J's Avatar
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    Retro photographic in the UK has ten packs of this film and the 100 speed version on special offer at the moment. It is from the last batch.
    £13.50 for the 400 asa and £11 for the 100asa
    http://www.retrophotographic.com/sho...FORTEPAN100120

    Charlie

  9. #19
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    I used to use it a lot before they stopped making it, in 4x5. My first box was a disaster, but a couple things about it.

    First, it is actually ASA or ISO 200, even though they call it 400. For best results, shoot it at 200 or even 100.

    It requires longer time in the developer than say Tri-x. For example, if I had a time fo 9 minutes in HC-110 for Tri-X (using a weak dilution) then Fortepan would take 10 min 30 sec.

    Fortepan had extended red sensitivity, very similar to the tonal range of tech-pan. In fact, think "grainy tech pan" at 200 ASA and you have Forte Pan almost. The red sensitivity, and if developed right, had a wonderful tonality. Sorry to see it gone.
    joe

  10. #20
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    There was an old version of Fortepan 400 produced several years ago that was very flat with a relatively low Dmax. Eventually (around 2004, if I remember correctly) they improved the Dmax significantly, and it was a pretty decent film, also sold as J&C Classic 400, Classicpan 400, Europan 400, and there was probably a Freestyle version as well. It was similar to Tri-X with more controllable highlights. It was a softer emulsion that required a little more care in processing as well. I used quite a lot of it and still have a few boxes in the freezer.

    I rated it at 160 in ABC pyro for Azo prints, but could get 640 out of it in Acufine for prints on around grade 3 enlarging paper.

    You can use development times for TXP as a starting point, but for the same contrast as TXP, you might increase development time about 10-15%. In practice, I've sometimes shot it and processed it interchangeably with TXT (the previous version of Tri-X 320 sheet film) or TXP in mixed batches.

    This was was on J&C Classic 400--

    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphot...=500&ppuser=60
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

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