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  1. #31

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    Tmax is a good option, if I'm understanding you don't want to collect chems to brew exotic developer. Tmax will give you good, sharp negatives and a bump in real film speed too, but maybe most important, good tones.

  2. #32
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    HC-110, ...
    Yes, HC-110 is my #1 choice now. I found some at my favorite photo place downtown.

    Easy to store, easy to make, easy to use, and grain up the wazoo, especially on Tri-X http://www.flickr.com/photos/nagoya_boston/2254244180/
    Those who know, shoot film

  3. #33
    Rolleijoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    It might appear to be contrary to logic, but Microdol-X can make for a very good developer without delivering very fine grain. The trick is to use it diluted 1+3. The same can be said for D-76, though it can be difficult to find data for many films with this dilution.
    When I used Microdol-X, it came in those beautiful brown bottles, and I still have about half a case of it. It's more of a fine grained developer, and definitely gives Tri-X a very nice look.

    If you're looking for grain, then push it a stop or so, and use Rodinal 1:25 for 6.5 min at regular times. If that's not enough, I knew someone who only shot Plus-X, processed in Acufine, but used much hotter temps than normal.

    You could count the grain splotches.

  4. #34
    Bobby Ironsights's Avatar
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DBP
    You can also try using higher temps.


    Quote Originally Posted by IloveTLRs View Post
    Ah! Does that increase grain?
    Umm....OH YEAH!

    Plus, try dektol. A guy on the photo forum was messing around and he had graintastic film with dektol.

    But really, those old photo.j's were pushing the film harshly. Try bumping it two stops, or three (with peroxide fuming)

    Also, last but not least.....have you thought of using expired film from ebay "ALWAYS FROZEN.....WE PROMISE....PLEASE IGNORE SUN FADING ON BOX LABELS"

  5. #35
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby Ironsights View Post
    ... try dektol. A guy on the photo forum was messing around and he had graintastic film with dektol. ...
    I've used Dektol already http://www.flickr.com/photos/nagoya_boston/2251682768/

    Not bad, but HC-110 seems easier in that it's easier to mix and there's plenty of development times for it on the web. I was having a hard time finding reliable data for Dektol and Acros or Presto, etc.
    Those who know, shoot film

  6. #36

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    For that punchy look with razor edged grain, Rodinal (or its clones, li R-09) is the obvious choice. This is an excellent developer, with great sharpness and excellent gradation. But it celebrates the film grain rather than hiding it. Among the MQ type developers, DK-50 and DK-60a (more active, more contrast than DK-50, somewhat more grain) come to mind. Agfa 42 and ID-3 might be interesting.

  7. #37
    Dave Krueger's Avatar
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    I've been experimenting with producing course grained pictures. I have done it using HP5+ and TMZ, both 35mm. Obviously, the TMZ grain is larger than the HP5+. I have been doing this only in the studio where I have control over the lighting. My technique has settled on reducing the lighting ratio, over-exposing the film by at least 2-3 stops, and then under developing in Rodinal. I then print the resulting negatives using a very high contrast filter. The high contrast filter really exaggerates the grainy look.

    I am very pleased with the results and now have two of the HP5+ pictures hanging in my office at work (see attachment). I can get TMZ sized grain from HP5+ by doubling the enlargement size and cropping down (as in these examples), but you have to plan for that when you're shooting.

    I plan to be doing a lot more of this is the future. And that's coming from someone who has, up to now, made it his mission in life to squeeze the best fine grain performance possible out of a 35mm frame. I also plan to try print developer sometime, since it's often highly recommended.

    -Dave
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails shelli-11-11-07_8.jpg   shelli-11-11-07_9.jpg  

  8. #38
    Dave Krueger's Avatar
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    P.S. There are also negative intensification techniques that enhance grain. I haven't tried it yet, but you can probably find info about it in The Negative (Adams) and Tim Rudman's book. Perhaps there are people here who could elaborate on it some.

    -Dave

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