Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,872   Posts: 1,520,117   Online: 862
      
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 33 of 33

Thread: Ortho Films?

  1. #31

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,684
    Quote Originally Posted by maxbloom View Post
    Contrast has a really thick base. Contrast does not
    have the characteristic thin lith-style base, ... Kodak
    does not recommend Kodalith as a developer for Contrast.
    I see no reason to conclude that it is a lith film.
    End usage likely an issue of base thickness. Save for
    the RA line/half tone films there are no LITH films perse.
    A lith developer is needed to produce lith results which
    need not be high contrast results. Lith prints often
    have a pictorial gradation.

    I detect some confusion and it is due to terminology.
    Lith, half-tone, graphic art, line, ortho, process. Any
    of several films can qualify for all those descriptives.

    For example I just went Google for, Soemarko LC-1
    Developer. Specifically the article deals with APH and
    APHS; Half Tone and Half Tone Supreme LITH films. His
    developer; pictorial results from those, general category,
    graphic art films. Worth a read. Dan

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Van Buren, Arkansas
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,412
    Images
    101
    It really is only in recent years that the "terminology" has become confusing, as back in the 1970's and 1980's, the only thing we used ortho/litho film for, was making high contrast images, such as line art for title slides, masks for background dropouts, and "high contrast conversions" of continuous tone originals for graphic design effects. I always used Kodalith A & B developer, which was a very active BLACK AND PURE WHITE DEVELOPER.

    Now that "Lith" means a type of printing technique with specific developers and papers, the classic understanding of these thin emulsion ortho sensitive films is misunderstood, I think.

    In general (with few exceptions) an "Ortho" film as available today is a thin emulsion (not necessarily thin base) orthochromatic sensitive film designed for high-contrast work, using specific developers designed to enhance this effect.

    HOWEVER, you CAN get full toned results from these same films by developing them in soft-working (as compared to normal for these films) developers. Most b/w film developers for common films would be considered "soft working" in the context of using them for Ortho film.

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,684
    Quote Originally Posted by PHOTOTONE View Post
    It really is only in recent years that the "terminology"
    has become confusing, ...

    HOWEVER, you CAN get full toned results from
    these same films
    Full toned results. Another article worth a read is
    at Unblinking Eye. At Google enter, aphs less is more .

    BTW, Thin vs thick. The process camera I worked
    with had a Sticky Back. Some have vacuum backs.
    That may be a reason for base variations. Dan

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin