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  1. #11
    hka
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    So do I when loading film I still put my glasses on to see... nothing more than without them...
    harry

    Release, the best you can do...

  2. #12
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    Congratulations wheelygirl!! So much fun yet to come...

  3. #13
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    Keep it up wheelygirl, you are now really getting hooked.

    Mick.

  4. #14
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    I started about 68 years ago see-sawing film through a soupbowl of MQ developer in a walk-in closet in my father's house and making contact prints on Velox paper.

    That eye closing habit is funny. I always have the feeling that if I see a little light and close my eyes, the film won't see it either. I usually works.
    Gadget Gainer

  5. #15

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    Is it really as easy as everyone makes it sound? I am an old dog (55 yrs) and would really like to learn this trick of developing b/w 35mm film and prints, and then maybe even move up to medium & larger formats (Holga? lol@me). Is one of these ~$50 developing kits from Freestyle the way to start, or can anyone recomend better stuff? I think I could load the reel in my bathroom at nite (no windows) and then process in the container. My biggest problem is no-confidence, so it's easier to shoot color and take it to wally-mart to process.

    My late grandmother had an old Kodak folder back in the 1910's era, and processed her own film & prints too I think, bless her heart. She had an image of some baby (I think) on a flat piece of metal, not sure how that was done, or if she did it or not. Does anyone know anything about that? I think the metal was folded up some, may have kind of ruined the image, it seems to be flaking off the metal somewhat. I need to try and get a picture of this if I can find it next time I am back home.

    Sorry for the long winded comments. Thanks for all your help and advice.

    As Ansel used to say, Take a picture, it will last longer.

    pauliej

  6. #16
    Gay Larson's Avatar
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    Good luck and keep it up.
    Prints available in the APUG GAllery
    www.gaylarsonphotography.com

  7. #17
    highpeak's Avatar
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    "Welcome to the darkside" as a popular phase here says.

    I always exam the negatives before they finish washing.

    This forum is where I learned all my darkroom techniques, you will find it very helpful.

    Alex W.

  8. #18
    fhovie's Avatar
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    There really is no better place to learn chemical photography than here. Be careful about calling it a wet darkroom. We all try to keep them as dry as we can. My secret is linoleum and good rubber coving. There are days where the film just flys on the reel and then there are days I think I almost need to tray process them because the reels get so twitchy. I have both SS and plastic tanks and several reels for each. Sometimes I keep an extra reel close by if the one I am using is rebelling. So many things can be mastered in a short time. I don't think photography can ever be mastered - there is always something I learn every roll that improves my process, my eye, my technique. There is no end to the experimenting either. Solarization, mordancage, split toning, alt processes, and all of them have their unique strengths with different kinds of images. Try as much as you can and enjoy every minute of it. Even the failures. Ruining an image is like Vu de Je - I feel like I will be here again ...
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  9. #19
    gainer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pauliej View Post
    Is it really as easy as everyone makes it sound? I am an old dog (55 yrs) and would really like to learn this trick of developing b/w 35mm film and prints, and then maybe even move up to medium & larger formats (Holga? lol@me). Is one of these ~$50 developing kits from Freestyle the way to start, or can anyone recomend better stuff? I think I could load the reel in my bathroom at nite (no windows) and then process in the container. My biggest problem is no-confidence, so it's easier to shoot color and take it to wally-mart to process.

    My late grandmother had an old Kodak folder back in the 1910's era, and processed her own film & prints too I think, bless her heart. She had an image of some baby (I think) on a flat piece of metal, not sure how that was done, or if she did it or not. Does anyone know anything about that? I think the metal was folded up some, may have kind of ruined the image, it seems to be flaking off the metal somewhat. I need to try and get a picture of this if I can find it next time I am back home.

    Sorry for the long winded comments. Thanks for all your help and advice.

    As Ansel used to say, Take a picture, it will last longer.

    pauliej
    There is a process called tintype that you can look up on Google or perhaps on another forum of APUG. Another was Daguerrotype, but that was before your grandmother's time.
    Gadget Gainer

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